Attending a funeral at a non-Catholic church?
#1
I don't intend this to be a scrupulous post, but I was doing my examination of conscience this weekend and came across a question regarding the 1st commandment: "Have you attended other places of worship?"

This concerns me because I have a funeral service coming up next weekend which is at an evangelical Lutheran church. Would I commit a sin in attending such a service?
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#2
One of the Corporal Works of Mercy is to bury the dead.
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#3
(12-23-2019, 10:46 AM)Augustinian Wrote: I don't intend this to be a scrupulous post, but I was doing my examination of conscience this weekend and came across a question regarding the 1st commandment: "Have you attended other places of worship?"

This concerns me because I have a funeral service coming up next weekend which is at an evangelical Lutheran church. Would I commit a sin in attending such a service?
Seems to me the same as attending non-Catholic weddings--that is, the communal support we give our friends (or now, family, as many folks secularize, intermarry, blur, and mix and match "faiths") allows us to join such celebrations or memorials. But not to take communion, of course. I recall my mom asking the parish priest ca. 1970 if we could attend a Protestant friends' wedding, and he assured us that was fine. I get the impression even pre-V2 that this was not totally verboten, at least in some American jurisdictions?

Of course, when it comes to attending a wedding of a Catholic not marrying in the faith, it's a different situation. But as for funerals, it feels downright churlish not to offer one's mutual friendship and kindness to our friends in a time of grief, as a fundamental obligation. "Attending other places of worship" might  (?) be parsed as doing so to participate in the liturgical ritual and not a marriage or funeral, as these are beyond the ordinary "weekly" service that a Catholic would not be expected to attend nor join in as the normal routine? Baptisms, marriages and funerals in modern society seem occasions for communal participation rather than denominational affirmation. I'm sure most of us have invited non-Catholics with no hesitation at all to join in these life-events commemorated in "our" sanctuary.
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#4
It wouldn’t be a sin to simply attend. Just don’t receive communion if they do that there. Personally, I find evangelical funerals unbearable and won’t attend them unless they are close family members. I can’t stand evangelical music or the tendency at evengelical funerals for old ladies to go up in front of everyone and cry while wailing about how much the dead person meant to them. I actually wrote a thread about it here after I had gone to an evangelical church for a meeting at the same time a funeral was taking place. It was awful.
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#5
You're not necessarily attending another place of worship because you're not really worshipping there, you're supporting a friend, family or coworker by attending a funeral.
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#6
Evangelical Lutheran has nothing to do with Evangelicalism. At least here in Europe, that's what the (relatively) high church Lutherans are all called.
Regardless, of course you can go to the funeral to express your condolences and offer your Catholic prayers for the souls departed. But you're technically not allowed to participate in the liturgy...
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#7
(12-24-2019, 07:47 AM)ThatGladTrad Wrote: Evangelical Lutheran has nothing to do with Evangelicalism. At least here in Europe, that's what the (relatively) high church Lutherans are all called.
Regardless, of course you can go to the funeral to express your condolences and offer your Catholic prayers for the souls departed. But you're technically not allowed to participate in the liturgy...

Yep. In fact, many Evangelical Lutheran Churches, at least that I've been in, LOOK like Catholic Churches, right down to the Crucifix on the altar.
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#8
(12-24-2019, 04:21 PM)jovan66102 Wrote:
(12-24-2019, 07:47 AM)ThatGladTrad Wrote: Evangelical Lutheran has nothing to do with Evangelicalism. At least here in Europe, that's what the (relatively) high church Lutherans are all called.
Regardless, of course you can go to the funeral to express your condolences and offer your Catholic prayers for the souls departed. But you're technically not allowed to participate in the liturgy...

Yep. In fact, many Evangelical Lutheran Churches, at least that I've been in, LOOK like Catholic Churches, right down to the Crucifix on the altar.

And look and "act" more Catholic than a majority of your St John Neumann Churches...and altar rails.

Coming into the Catholic Church (NO) from Lutheranism seemed a step down at first in terms of liturgy because of the sh*t show of Vaticanturd Deuce.
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