Cloth Diapers?
#1
Moms (and Dads), I'm considering cloth diapering for our son, who will be born in May. I like the kind of diapers that are like a rectangle white piece of absorbent cloth that you fold and pin with a safety pin and then cover with a waterproof cover. Are there any particular brands of waterproof diaper covers you can suggest that grow with the baby? I don't want to use the kind of cloth diapers with inserts because they don't seem to be as convenient; I don't want to deal with the snaps on the inserts, etc. 

Thanks in advance; trying to save money and be wise so I'm not spending tons of money on reusable diapers that our son will only be able to wear for a few weeks.  ;)
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#2
Its been quite a few years since I'd had to concern myself over diapers, but in the 70s, my dear departed wife and I got a washing machine as soon as we could to do the diapers in. Bleach, water and baby detergent are much cheaper and less polluting than the disposable ones.

Good choice!
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#3
Have you looked into the upfront costs of cloth diapers?  You will need a few/several dozen, depending on your washing machine situation.  You can either hang them to dry outside or stretch a line across the living room if you don't have a dryer.
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There are a few online companies that sell the outer/rubber pant part.  There are also patterns online so you can make your own if you are handy and have a sewing machine.  Their customer reviews are almost all good.  If you are really handy, you may be able to fasten some Velcro to the diaper so you can avoid the pins - it will have to be redone from time to time due to chemicals, but it would mean no pins.
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I did not use cloth diapers.  The upfront cost was high.  And, frankly, I remember what life was like before disposables existed, and it smelled and it was gross.  Environmentally it is a toss up, using water and chemicals vs. landfill, no good or right answer for everyone.  Mom used diapers that pinned on each hip (2 pins) and rubber pants and she had a diaper service.  However, if you are planning to have more children, then cloth can be a good financial decision.
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Expect to go thru up to a dozen diapers a day.  Cloth diapers work much better when they don't get soaking wet and that also reduces diaper rash.  Air out the baby bottom at almost every change, just a minute or two (beware the spray), some people use oil, some use baby corn starch, some use ointment, that will depend on baby, but air really helps.  One grandson screamed when you put lotion on him, loved the corn starch.   You don't have to use soap at every bath.  Also, I used plain paper towels with water to clean the bottom, my grandkids all used the wipes, all babies are different.
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#4
This is one of those things that sounds good, natural, and responsible before you have your first baby. And then when reality hits, and you're changing 8-10 diapers a day, you come to realize that disposable diapers were invented for a reason.

Also, don't worry about getting the "natural" disposables or even the Huggies or Pampers. Luvs (and even some good store brands) are just fine and will save you a bunch. Look for deals and coupons, or even post on facebook to see if any moms in the neighborhood have leftover diapers that their children have outgrown and you can get a bunch for free.
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#5
My husband and I switched our baby to cloth diapers when he was a couple months old and have no intentions of going back to disposables. We tried just about every brand of disposable and they just didn’t work for us.

We use the Grovia brand, which is somewhat in the middle of the road for price. They sell the trifold setup that you seem to be describing, however, we primarily use their hybrid set up (and the all-in-ones with boosters at night). The trifold is much much cheaper. Even Gerbers makes some of the organic cotton kind that is very inexpensive. Grovia sells a kind of device that can be uses in lieu of safety pins. The hybrid kind with snaps is actually very easy and convenient, though. You might benefit from trying them.

We never ever thought we would be cloth diaper people (I used to roll my eyes whenever friends mentioned them), but we’re fans now. The upfront cost was intimidating. We think they’re worth the investment.
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#6
(01-27-2020, 04:38 PM)Elle19 Wrote: My husband and I switched our baby to cloth diapers when he was a couple months old and have no intentions of going back to disposables. We tried just about every brand of disposable and they just didn’t work for us.

We use the Grovia brand, which is somewhat in the middle of the road for price. They sell the trifold setup that you seem to be describing, however, we primarily use their hybrid set up (and the all-in-ones with boosters at night). The trifold is much much cheaper. Even Gerbers makes some of the organic cotton kind that is very inexpensive. Grovia sells a kind of device that can be uses in lieu of safety pins. The hybrid kind with snaps is actually very easy and convenient, though. You might benefit from trying them.

We never ever thought we would be cloth diaper people (I used to roll my eyes whenever friends mentioned them), but we’re fans now. The upfront cost was intimidating. We think they’re worth the investment.


We have been using cloth since we brought or first little guy home. It is AMAZING to me how expensive disposables are compared to the cloth. The upfront cost was high but no recurring expenses is my favorite thing. 

Grovia is excellent for covers, we use mostly Alva since they are inexpensive on Amazon. 

Don’t use the Gerber cloth you can buy in target except as spit rags, they aren’t nearly absorbent enough. 

Make sure you have about 3-4 dozen diapers (either flats or prefolds) and about 6-12 covers. If you plan on doing laundry every day, you will need a lot of covers during the newborn phase but not so many later. Also, word of warning, newborn number 2’s are like tar. It’s not a bad idea to use disposables for the first week or two just to get past the yucky poop and through the chaos of the first couple weeks. 

there is a great website about this as well that I can’t quite recall (I want to say it is fluff love or something like that) that has tons of information about soap, washing, etc. that was very useful for my initial “onboarding” process.
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#7
Cloth diapers can sometimes be found online used from another mother (ebay).  Some ladies make their own (hey it's just cloth and time).  I remember buying two huge bags of them for a friend before she had twins (I think it cost me $20 total).  The key with cloth diapers is that you need to wash daily and have a bucket with bleach water in it to dump the soiled ones in to soak until the end of day.  If you rinse them well and then put them in bleach, they work fine.  They are no more stinky or nasty than the disposable ones.  And if you rinse them and handle any poo at the moment of changing, it really isn't too bad.  I would suggest you consider learning about elimination communication at the same time.  It will shorten the amount of time you are in diapers - which is almost always beneficial.
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