Polish National Catholic Church
#1
Has anyone had any experience with them ? What I know is that they were much larger in the 1920's and 1930's, and initially promoted the idea in the United States, that Polish Catholics were often looked down upon by the typically Irish or German leadership. They also brought in alot of new members who were in irregular marital situations by inviting them to receive Holy Communion and become parish members, at a time when the Catholic Church strictly enforced such things. Some of their other beliefs are rather Protestant. No intercessory prayer, not even to the Blessed Mother, though I believe they accept all other Marian doctrines. And if I remember correctly, they only have private confession for children, after which they only participate in a general confession of the congegation.
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#2
They split from the Union of Utrecht when Utrecht began ordaining priestesses. Here's a summary of their beliefs:

  • reject the dogma of papal infallibility and the universal episcopate of the Bishop of Rome
  • reject the dogmatic pronouncement of the Immaculate Conception, although not the dogma itself
  • reject the dogmatic pronouncement of the Assumption of Mary, although not the dogma itself
  • reject ordination of women to the priesthood, consecration of women to the episcopate,
  • and the blessing of same-sex unions,
  • and affirm a sacrificial understanding of the Eucharist, not as a continual repetition nor a renewal of Jesus' sacrifice, but as a perpetual commemoration of the sacrifice.

As an aside, I once knew a Priest who had started out as Catholic. He fell in love with a woman in the Parish choir. They left the Church, joined the PNC and wed. Of course, his Priesthood was recognised, so he continued as a Priest. Then he got into a spat with the 'Prime Bishop', as they call their head, left the PNC and became an Episcopal Priest.
Jovan-Marya of the Immaculate Conception Weismiller, T.O.Carm.

Vive le Christ-roi! Vive le roi, Louis XX!
Deum timete, regem honorificate.
Kansan by birth! Albertan by choice! Jayhawk by the Grace of God!
  “Qui me amat, amet et canem meum. (Who loves me will love my dog also.)” 
St Bernard of Clairvaux

My Blog 'Musings of an Old Curmudgeon'


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#3
(01-15-2020, 06:40 PM)jovan66102 Wrote: They split from the Union of Utrecht when Utrecht began ordaining priestesses. Here's a summary of their beliefs:

  • reject the dogma of papal infallibility and the universal episcopate of the Bishop of Rome
  • reject the dogmatic pronouncement of the Immaculate Conception, although not the dogma itself
  • reject the dogmatic pronouncement of the Assumption of Mary, although not the dogma itself
  • reject ordination of women to the priesthood, consecration of women to the episcopate,
  • and the blessing of same-sex unions,
  • and affirm a sacrificial understanding of the Eucharist, not as a continual repetition nor a renewal of Jesus' sacrifice, but as a perpetual commemoration of the sacrifice.

As an aside, I once knew a Priest who had started out as Catholic. He fell in love with a woman in the Parish choir. They left the Church, joined the PNC and wed. Of course, his Priesthood was recognised, so he continued as a Priest. Then he got into a spat with the 'Prime Bishop', as they call their head, left the PNC and became an Episcopal Priest.
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#4
(01-15-2020, 10:04 PM)Eric F Wrote:
(01-15-2020, 06:40 PM)jovan66102 Wrote: They split from the Union of Utrecht when Utrecht began ordaining priestesses. Here's a summary of their beliefs:

  • reject the dogma of papal infallibility and the universal episcopate of the Bishop of Rome
  • reject the dogmatic pronouncement of the Immaculate Conception, although not the dogma itself
  • reject the dogmatic pronouncement of the Assumption of Mary, although not the dogma itself
  • reject ordination of women to the priesthood, consecration of women to the episcopate,
  • and the blessing of same-sex unions,
  • and affirm a sacrificial understanding of the Eucharist, not as a continual repetition nor a renewal of Jesus' sacrifice, but as a perpetual commemoration of the sacrifice.

As an aside, I once knew a Priest who had started out as Catholic. He fell in love with a woman in the Parish choir. They left the Church, joined the PNC and wed. Of course, his Priesthood was recognised, so he continued as a Priest. Then he got into a spat with the 'Prime Bishop', as they call their head, left the PNC and became an Episcopal Priest.

                                                     Also, my understanding is that during their heyday, the PNCC's credit union was much larger than the church itself.
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#5
The PNCC is also one of the two major schisms caused by Bishop John Ireland.  He also is the cause of about half of the Byzantine Catholics in the country at the time splitting off and joining Russian Orthodox Metropolia, which later became the OCA.  In fact, if it weren't for this bishop, there would be no PNCC, and the Orthodox church in this country would be significantly smaller, and more peculiarly Greek.
I have resigned myself to the reality that I shall have no peace or joy should I continue to exist for eternity.  The question of deism or Christianity no longer matters.  I hope that Christianity is a farce, and that when I die, my consciousness will cease to exist.  In the meantime, I ask the Theotokos to be at my side at my judgement and ask her to intercede to, as I beg, Christ to have mercy on me and to allow me to cease to exist when I die.
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#6
(01-16-2020, 05:25 PM)Melkite Wrote: The PNCC is also one of the two major schisms caused by Bishop John Ireland.  He also is the cause of about half of the Byzantine Catholics in the country at the time splitting off and joining Russian Orthodox Metropolia, which later became the OCA.  In fact, if it weren't for this bishop, there would be no PNCC, and the Orthodox church in this country would be significantly smaller, and more peculiarly Greek.

                                               Never heard that Bishop Ireland was responsible for the PNCC. That's odd since it didn't begin in his Diocese.
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#7
(01-16-2020, 05:31 PM)Eric F Wrote:                                                Never heard that Bishop Ireland was responsible for the PNCC. That's odd since it didn't begin in his Diocese.

Indirectly, but still responsible. He led the 'Irish Mafia' that controlled the American Church and they were not keen on 'polacks', especially Priests coming from the Old Country. From Wikipedia:
Quote:During the late 19th century many Polish immigrants to the U.S. became dismayed with the hierarchy of the Roman Catholic Church. The U.S. Church had no Polish bishops and few Polish priests, and would not allow the Polish language to be taught in parish schools. The mainly ethnic Irish and German bishops helped establish hundreds of parishes for Poles, but priests were usually unable to speak Polish, and the new immigrants had poor or limited English. There were also disputes over who owned church property, particularly in Buffalo, New York and Scranton, Pennsylvania, with the parishioners demanding greater control.
Jovan-Marya of the Immaculate Conception Weismiller, T.O.Carm.

Vive le Christ-roi! Vive le roi, Louis XX!
Deum timete, regem honorificate.
Kansan by birth! Albertan by choice! Jayhawk by the Grace of God!
  “Qui me amat, amet et canem meum. (Who loves me will love my dog also.)” 
St Bernard of Clairvaux

My Blog 'Musings of an Old Curmudgeon'


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#8
(01-15-2020, 06:28 PM)Eric F Wrote: Has anyone had any experience with them ?
My wife used to work next door to their church near Hollywood. Run by a friendly priest from Poland and his wife. But as nearly no Poles attend in this half-Armenian, half-Latino L.A. neighborhood anymore, they say Masses targeted at Spanish-speaking Catholics, with banners advertising services in Spanish and they reach out to the local heavily immigrant area. I wonder with recent immigration from Poland if this has boosted any PNCC parish life in traditional destinations such as Chicagoland? Or if their Polish-ethnic congregants are descendents of American immigration and turf wars in dioceses from the late 19\early 20c?
The deeds you do may be the only sermon some people may hear today (Francis of Assisi); Win an argument, lose a soul (Fulton Sheen)
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