How to acquire a relic?
#1
I would love to have the relic of a saint for veneration in our home, but I know that purchasing relics is the sin of simony. I'm curious what methods there are for acquiring relics in a legitimate way. Krogerfeedback Is this simply a matter of "knowing a guy"?
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#2
(01-20-2020, 12:33 AM)eplein Wrote: I would love to have the relic of a saint for veneration in our home, but I know that purchasing relics is the sin of simony. I'm curious what methods there are for acquiring relics in a legitimate way. Is this simply a matter of "knowing a guy"?

I do not know all the methods but I will tell you how I got mine. In Italy there is a store run by nuns where you can go ask them what relics are being offered now. They will then tell you what they have and explain to you that they will charge you some money for the reliquary not for the relic. That is how I got mine on more than one visit  I think this place is at the top of the Scala Sancta but I am not sure. If you go to Italy and stay with any of the nuns, they will tell you about this place.
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#3
Sorry, I forgot to add that what I explained above refers to first class relics. Third class relics are sold in many stores belonging to the shrines of saints. So for example I was able to get a third class relic of the Cure of Ars , St Bernadette, among others from their shrines abroad.
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#4
First-class relics are no longer given to the laity under current law, including (to my knowledge) by the above-mentioned Dominican sisters in Rome.  And this is a good thing, as relics are intended for public veneration rather than private collection, and are too precious to be trusted in the hands of the common layman, even if a handful of pious outliers might be trustworthy with them.

I would encourage you instead to get a statue or icon of the saint you have a special devotion to, which is the usual manner of lay veneration of saints, or to seek out a third class relic of the saint which you can venerate.  These are the normal manners of veneration for laity.

Sorry if that isn't the answer you want to hear!
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#5
Steven.
When did they stop giving relics to the laity? Thanks
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#6
(01-20-2020, 03:17 AM)Steven Wrote: First-class relics are no longer given to the laity under current law, ...

Citation?
Jovan-Marya of the Immaculate Conception Weismiller, T.O.Carm.

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#7
My Anglican pastor would frequently wear a WWI battle-cross which had a relic in it. I don't know which. He would bring it since we were a mission church with no altar (we gathered at a local cemetery that let us use the mausoleum and put together a couple slabs of wood each week). An altar must have a relic to actually be an altar. So he would wear it so that we'd have a relic at Mass.

I don't know where he got it but I do know he served as a U.S. Marine so it is possible he may have obtained it some where in his past ventures being stationed in various areas.
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#8
(01-20-2020, 05:20 AM)jovan66102 Wrote:
(01-20-2020, 03:17 AM)Steven Wrote: First-class relics are no longer given to the laity under current law, ...

Citation?

Well jovan, when I was member of some other 'Catholic' forum (yes, that one), I interacted once or twice in similar topics, and what some used to repeat and praise ad nauseam is that this was decided by pope John Paul II back in the 90's. 
The only solid argument I could find is that these norms were published in Italian (Notitiae 30/1994, 349-350) and are not available online.

https://canonlawmadeeasy.com/2017/06/15/...of-relics/
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#9
Thankfully El Rey Felipe II of Spain lived centuries before this norm and was able to set his provate collection at the El Escorial palace.
[Image: escorial_relicario_06_ret_anunciacion.jpg][Image: escorial_relicario_03_ret_san_jeronimo_abierto.jpg]
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#10
(01-20-2020, 10:28 AM)Ioannes_L Wrote:
(01-20-2020, 05:20 AM)jovan66102 Wrote:
(01-20-2020, 03:17 AM)Steven Wrote: First-class relics are no longer given to the laity under current law, ...

Citation?

Well jovan, when I was member of some other 'Catholic' forum (yes, that one), I interacted once or twice in similar topics, and what some used to repeat and praise ad nauseam is that this was decided by pope John Paul II back in the 90's. 
The only solid argument I could find is that these norms were published in Italian (Notitiae 30/1994, 349-350) and are not available online.

https://canonlawmadeeasy.com/2017/06/15/...of-relics/

Thank you, Ioannes. That does clarify it. However, as the article points out it is not illegal for a private person to possess such a relic and to pass it on to another, as long as there is no simony involved.
Jovan-Marya of the Immaculate Conception Weismiller, T.O.Carm.

Vive le Christ-roi! Vive le roi, Louis XX!
Deum timete, regem honorificate.
Kansan by birth! Albertan by choice! Jayhawk by the Grace of God!
“Qui me amat, amet et canem meum. (Who loves me will love my dog.)” 
St Bernard of Clairvaux

My Blog 'Musings of an Old Curmudgeon'
FishEaters Group on MeWe
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