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#21
I wonder if perhaps speaking to the Melkite priest and others in the Church about your difficulties with the disease would help you gain enough trust that it would reduce the anxiety.

I have a good friend with pretty severe anxiety, especially in crowds, but often that was at least somewhat overcome after some time of acclimatization, especially after some more person experiences with the people in charge of the group.

The priest in a parish is meant to be a kind of Father for the whole parish, and one of the important things to feeling accepted and comfortable, even in otherwise difficult situations is to have that feeling that your father is there to help you. That's the same with our biological fathers, mentors, priests, and ultimately God Himself.

I'd encourage you to speak openly to the Melkite priest about your difficulties, with the hope that he will help you gain a trust and lessen the anxiety.

As I said, I'm happy to hear that you are in an environment that Providence seems to have arranged and will make you happier as a Catholic than the Ukrainian parish seems to portend.
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#22
(01-28-2020, 04:52 PM)MagisterMusicae Wrote: I wonder if perhaps speaking to the Melkite priest and others in the Church about your difficulties with the disease would help you gain enough trust that it would reduce the anxiety.

I have a good friend with pretty severe anxiety, especially in crowds, but often that was at least somewhat overcome after some time of acclimatization, especially after some more person experiences with the people in charge of the group.

The priest in a parish is meant to be a kind of Father for the whole parish, and one of the important things to feeling accepted and comfortable, even in otherwise difficult situations is to have that feeling that your father is there to help you. That's the same with our biological fathers, mentors, priests, and ultimately God Himself.

I'd encourage you to speak openly to the Melkite priest about your difficulties, with the hope that he will help you gain a trust and lessen the anxiety.

As I said, I'm happy to hear that you are in an environment that Providence seems to have arranged and will make you happier as a Catholic than the Ukrainian parish seems to portend.
Actually, several people do know about that. Though it would certainly help to inform that I will be moving in with them officially for Sunday worship. It seems the original accommodation (the dispensation to attend services at the Ukrainian Catholic parish) on Sundays will not work unless that priest has a change of heart but it may be useless any ways.

My godmother usually stays in the back of the nave with her two youngest. Sometimes, I've stood by her oldest as well. Her husband and three boys usually serve at the altar. I'm certain she won't mind if I keep her company during the liturgy.

It would definitely help to be able to spend more time with these people who overflow with love.
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#23
(01-28-2020, 07:52 PM)newenglandsun Wrote: (the dispensation to attend services at the Ukrainian Catholic parish)

Ain't no such thing! You are a Catholic. A Catholic may attend Mass or Divine Liturgy and receive Holy Communion in any Catholic Church of any Catholic Rite. You don't need a 'dispensation'!
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#24
(01-29-2020, 02:12 AM)jovan66102 Wrote:
(01-28-2020, 07:52 PM)newenglandsun Wrote: (the dispensation to attend services at the Ukrainian Catholic parish)

Ain't no such thing! You are a Catholic. A Catholic may attend Mass or Divine Liturgy and receive Holy Communion in any Catholic Church of any Catholic Rite. You don't need a 'dispensation'!
Though I don't even think that would have made the Ukrainian priest budge!
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#25
Though I do experience some anxiety here and there, mine ain't that problematic as yours, yet I might understand your problem.
I'm hoping that your new Melkite pastor is as nice as the one I knew when I attended their Divine Liturgy last year:
After the end of the Liturgy he spoke, with a heavy Arab accent, that they had coffee and cookies for those who wanted to stay a bit longer and have a chat.

And let me give you a friendly advice.
I don't like crowds too, and my SSPX chapel is almost bursting at this point due to the number of old and new faithful, so what I do is simple, I sit in the first benches and don't look back. Not to mention that after countless Sundays I'm getting used to them and their numbers.
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#26
(01-29-2020, 10:27 AM)Ioannes_L Wrote: Though I do experience some anxiety here and there, mine ain't that problematic as yours, yet I might understand your problem.
I'm hoping that your new Melkite pastor is as nice as the one I knew when I attended their Divine Liturgy last year:
After the end of the Liturgy he spoke, with a heavy Arab accent, that they had coffee and cookies for those who wanted to stay a bit longer and have a chat.

And let me give you a friendly advice.
I don't like crowds too, and my SSPX chapel is almost bursting at this point due to the number of old and new faithful, so what I do is simple, I sit in the first benches and don't look back. Not to mention that after countless Sundays I'm getting used to them and their numbers.
The one you describe sounds like Fr. Ephrem Handal. Yes. He is super nice when you get to know him well. He has a bit of a snappy side but overall, very nice. He got tea for me once.
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