Western and Eastern Devotions
#1
I saw a comment touching on this and so wanted to ask more.

Although I say western devotions, assist in the old Roman rite, and I am a Roman Catholic, I say Orthodox prayers of preparation for communion and sometimes recite akathists.

Is this practice of adopting Eastern devotions by Roman Catholics discouraged?

I wasn't sure what to do in Lent with the "alleluias" which are used during Lent in the east.  So I may simply adopt western prayers to prepare for communion, as these are included in the paper missal at the Latin mass.

The Eastern prayers are very long and rich, though!
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#2
I would strongly suggest you stick to one style.  Like I said in the recent thread to Melkite about the Rosary, the various devotions and expressions used in both East and West carry within them an entire embedded universe of meaning. When you pray in a certain way, using certain forms in a certain sense you are incarnating and bringing to life those various meanings and contexts that those prayers and gestures came out of.  The law of prayer is the law of belief.  If you consistently pray in an Eastern manner you cannot help but start to live and think in an Eastern way.  The same applies to the Western.  I suggest you decide on one or the other and try to make that your practice for years.  That's what I did after years of going between the Old Benedictine Breviary and some version (HTM, Jordanville, Old Orthodox) of an Eastern prayerbook. In fact, someone on this forum privately suggested I choose one and stick to it and I did.  I'm not feeling ANY pull in two directions anymore,  but I did, and strongly, back when I was engaged in trying to live out both an Eastern and a Western spiritual life.  

Of course you'll get different opinions but as someone who tried this for years I can only tell you that choosing one and sticking with it is the smoother path longterm.  

Just be forewarned, if you choose East you might end up like me and become Orthodox altogether.  Many Eastern Catholics feel that pull eventually even if they never go there.  I was always inclined to it anyway.  Just be forewarned,  how you pray very strongly informs how you believe.  I don't think a lot of people truly consider that deeply.
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#3
I'm a Latin mass Catholic and I've been an occasional reader in an Eastern Catholic parish. I think we have alot more in common with each other than some people think. The West is in the East and the East is in the West. All one has to do is to look at a book like Ludwig Ott's Fundamentals of Catholic Dogma to see how much the Church has relied on the Eastern fathers in formulating theology.
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#4
(02-04-2020, 07:10 PM)everbecoming2007 Wrote: Is this practice of adopting Eastern devotions by Roman Catholics discouraged?

It's not discouraged at all. If anything, it's becoming much more encouraged. I personally love many of the Eastern devotions, most importantly the Jesus Prayer, and have a personal affinity for Russian Orthodox icons (of which I own several). I don't see anything wrong with intermingling East and West. They are part of the same Mystical Body of Christ, after all.
"The Heart of Jesus is closer to you when you suffer, than when you are full of joy." - St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

'Vanity of vanities, said Ecclesiastes: vanity of vanities, and all is vanity.' - Ecclesiastes 1:2
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#5
I strongly believe our Mother Church, Who is Universal, and embraces both East and West as two sons and daughters of a same family, will begin to "breathe with two lungs again" [in the sense of Eastern and Western Christendom being re-united in the Catholic Church again; the Orthodox returning to the fold] in this Third Christian Millenium, just as it was in the First Christian Millenium, before Caerularius in 1054 A.D.

I love Eastern rite devotions. I'm a Catholic, Latin, but from "the East" myself, being from India. In India, we all call ourselves St. Thomas Christians, out of devotion to the Apostle who brought us the Faith. Latin Catholics and Eastern Catholics get along fine and mix many devotions. You will find those who devoutly assist at Syriac Qurbana (their Mass or Divine Liturgy), as in the Syro-Malabar, and Syro-Malankara Eastern rite, happily adopt Byzantine Icons like Our Lady of Perpetual Help, and Western Icons like the Images of the Sacred Heart of Jesus. I feel we are Universal first, that's what Catholic means. That means we have the right to enrich ourselves as we like with the spiritual treasures of either the Eastern Catholic Church or the Western Catholic Church; or any Eastern Orthodox Prayer that is Catholic. 

The Jesus Prayer is one such great Eastern Prayer. I say it often, especially before going up to receive Holy Communion at Holy Mass: "The Jesus Prayer,[a] also known as The Prayer,[b] is a short formulaic prayer esteemed and advocated especially within the Eastern churches: "Lord Jesus Christ, Son of God, have mercy on me, a sinner."[3] From: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jesus_Prayer It's an entirely Catholic Prayer, and so there are no issues imho. 

In Jesus and Mary,
Xavier. God Bless.
TEXT OF THE LIFE OFFERING: My dear Jesus, before the Holy Trinity, Our Heavenly Mother, and the whole Heavenly Court, united with your most precious Blood and your sacrifice on Calvary, I hereby offer my whole life to the intention of your Sacred Heart and to the Immaculate Heart of Mary.  Together with my life, I place at your disposal all Holy Masses, all my Holy Communions, all my good deeds, all my sacrifices, and the sufferings of my entire life for ... https://marianapostolate.com/life-offering/
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#6
(02-04-2020, 10:15 PM)XavierSem Wrote: I strongly believe our Mother Church, Who is Universal, and embraces both East and West as two sons and daughters of a same family, will begin to "breathe with two lungs again" [in the sense of Eastern and Western Christendom being re-united in the Catholic Church again; the Orthodox returning to the fold]

Despite his faults, this is one of those things that St. John Paul II said that I wholeheartedly agree with.


Quote:The Jesus Prayer is one such great Eastern Prayer. I say it often, especially before going up to receive Holy Communion at Holy Mass


I find myself repeating it either vocally or internally when I'm near occasions of sin or facing temptations. It is a wonderful tool to battle the world, the flesh and the Devil.
"The Heart of Jesus is closer to you when you suffer, than when you are full of joy." - St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

'Vanity of vanities, said Ecclesiastes: vanity of vanities, and all is vanity.' - Ecclesiastes 1:2
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#7
(02-04-2020, 09:15 PM)Augustinian Wrote:
(02-04-2020, 07:10 PM)everbecoming2007 Wrote: Is this practice of adopting Eastern devotions by Roman Catholics discouraged?

It's not discouraged at all. If anything, it's becoming much more encouraged. I personally love many of the Eastern devotions, most importantly the Jesus Prayer, and have a personal affinity for Russian Orthodox icons (of which I own several). I don't see anything wrong with intermingling East and West. They are part of the same Mystical Body of Christ, after all.

I totally agree! In my bookshelf on my desk, next to my Roman Breviary are my Eastern prayerbook, Psalter, and Book of Hours.
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#8
(02-04-2020, 08:02 PM)formerbuddhist Wrote: I would strongly suggest you stick to one style.  Like I said in the recent thread to Melkite about the Rosary, the various devotions and expressions used in both East and West carry within them an entire embedded universe of meaning. When you pray in a certain way, using certain forms in a certain sense you are incarnating and bringing to life those various meanings and contexts that those prayers and gestures came out of.  The law of prayer is the law of belief.  If you consistently pray in an Eastern manner you cannot help but start to live and think in an Eastern way.  The same applies to the Western.  I suggest you decide on one or the other and try to make that your practice for years.  That's what I did after years of going between the Old Benedictine Breviary and some version (HTM, Jordanville, Old Orthodox) of an Eastern prayerbook. In fact, someone on this forum privately suggested I choose one and stick to it and I did.  I'm not feeling ANY pull in two directions anymore,  but I did, and strongly, back when I was engaged in trying to live out both an Eastern and a Western spiritual life.  

Of course you'll get different opinions but as someone who tried this for years I can only tell you that choosing one and sticking with it is the smoother path longterm.  

Just be forewarned, if you choose East you might end up like me and become Orthodox altogether.  Many Eastern Catholics feel that pull eventually even if they never go there.  I was always inclined to it anyway.  Just be forewarned,  how you pray very strongly informs how you believe.  I don't think a lot of people truly consider that deeply.
Strongly disagree. Though I do find Western rite Orthodoxy attractive...and I'm a Melkite!
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#9
If you believe that Eastern and Western Christianity are fundamentally and essentially incompatible, then you will have a problem with it.

If you totally reject that notion, you will not have a problem with it.
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