Books/writings on the Eucharist
#1
So, I’m struggling with the enormous mystery that is the Eucharist. My faith in the real presence is by no means faltering, but since my conversion 4 years ago, I’m growing much more acquainted with the teaching and losing the initial awe I once felt at the fresh knowledge of Christ’s presence. It was once mystifying and powerful; I was perfectly content with my limited knowledge, merely reflecting on the beauty of the Eucharist alone was enough. But I now need some good books and/or writings from the saints or theologians on the Eucharist to build up my understanding and my awe. It is so important. I should have put more emphasis on the theology of the Eucharist before now. I thought I had, but I guess not. 

Any recommendations are appreciated. I’m a sucker for good writing. Writers I love are Hildebrand and Guardini, favorite saints are Edith Stein and St. John of the Cross, but none of them seem to  have writings on the Eucharist. At least I haven’t found any.

Edit: Replies about relying on awe are helpful. But my point is that I need theology... I have put too much emphasis on “awe” and not enough on “understanding,” in my original post. After I receive I am lately discouraged by how my life doesn’t revolve around loving the Eucharist. I’ve lost sight of its importance. And during communion I am asking myself questions like “Why do we even do this again? What does it mean?”
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#2
The Holy Eucharist by St Alphonsus Ligouri
"There is nothing more pleasing to God, than to see a soul who patiently and serenely bears whatever crosses it is sent; this is how love is made, by putting lover and loved one on the same level. . . A soul who loves Jesus Christ desires to be treated the way Christ was treated-desires to be poor, despised and humiliated."

St Alphonsus Ligouri
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#3
St Pierre-Julien Eymard, founder of the Congregation of the Blessed Sacrament for men, and the Servants of the Blessed Sacrament for women. The Blessed Eucharist is essentially the only thing he wrote about and lots of his works have been translated into English.

The Eymard Library

There are nine books in the Eymard Library, each of which focuses attention to a particular aspect of the ineffable mystery which is the Holy Eucharist - Ideal for Eucharistic Adoration


Available here (and I've dealt with this store, and they're excellent!)
Jovan-Marya of the Immaculate Conception Weismiller, T.O.Carm.

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#4
If you want a Scriptural analysis, Brant Pitre's 'Jesus and the Jewish Roots of the Eucharist' is pretty good.
"The Heart of Jesus is closer to you when you suffer, than when you are full of joy." - St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

Put not your trust in princes: In the children of men, in whom there is no salvation. - Ps. 145:2-3

"For there shall be a time, when they will not endure sound doctrine; but, according to their own desires, they will heap to themselves teachers, having itching ears: And will indeed turn away their hearing from the truth, but will be turned unto fables." - 2 Timothy 4:3-4
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#5
(02-24-2020, 12:43 AM)dante_angelico Wrote: So, I’m struggling with the enormous mystery that is the Eucharist. My faith in the real presence is by no means faltering, but since my conversion 4 years ago, I’m growing much more acquainted with the teaching and losing the initial awe I once felt at the fresh knowledge of Christ’s presence. It was once mystifying and powerful; I was perfectly content with my limited knowledge, merely reflecting on the beauty of the Eucharist alone was enough. But I now need some good books and/or writings from the saints or theologians on the Eucharist to build up my understanding and my awe. It is so important. I should have put more emphasis on the theology of the Eucharist before now. I thought I had, but I guess not. 

Any recommendations are appreciated. I’m a sucker for good writing. Writers I love are Hildebrand and Guardini, favorite saints are Edith Stein and St. John of the Cross, but none of them seem to  have writings on the Eucharist. At least I haven’t found any.


It sounds like you are missing the euphoria you first experienced.  It's a wonderful feeling, but it's not meant to be permanent.  There is nothing wrong with losing that "initial awe."  In fact, you should gradually lose it over time.  That's the nature of becoming acquainted with a constant reality.  Just as you will not feel like a teenager in love for the duration of a lifelong marriage, you will not experience euphoric awe for things of the faith for the duration of your life.  That's ok.  These things aren't meant to be experienced permanently.

Be careful that you don't seek out the awe for its experience rather than for God himself.  It can be easy to turn God's mystery into a carnival ride.
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#6
(02-24-2020, 12:43 AM)dante_angelico Wrote: Any recommendations are appreciated. I’m a sucker for good writing. Writers I love are Hildebrand and Guardini, favorite saints are Edith Stein and St. John of the Cross, but none of them seem to  have writings on the Eucharist. At least I haven’t found any.

To piggyback on Melkite's point, sensible consolations are always lost over time. Since you mention St. John of the Cross, you should go back and read Ascent of Mount Carmel again, if you haven't already, he talks specifically of this loss and the dryness which follows and which you seem to be experiencing. The idea is to just persevere through it in the darkness of faith rather than relying on those emotional consolations.

I can tell you that I've personally been in a dry period for a while now, and even though it can lead to melancholy, don't lose heart, trust that Christ is there in the Eucharist.
"The Heart of Jesus is closer to you when you suffer, than when you are full of joy." - St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

Put not your trust in princes: In the children of men, in whom there is no salvation. - Ps. 145:2-3

"For there shall be a time, when they will not endure sound doctrine; but, according to their own desires, they will heap to themselves teachers, having itching ears: And will indeed turn away their hearing from the truth, but will be turned unto fables." - 2 Timothy 4:3-4
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#7
This is helpful. But I have put too much emphasis on “awe” and not enough on “understanding,” in my original post. After I receive I am lately discouraged by how my life doesn’t revolve around loving the Eucharist. I’ve lost sight of its importance. And during communion I am asking myself questions like “Why do we even do this again? What does it mean?”
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#8
(02-24-2020, 12:42 PM)dante_angelico Wrote: This is helpful. But I have put too much emphasis on “awe” and not enough on “understanding,” in my original post. After I receive I am lately discouraged by how my life doesn’t revolve around loving the Eucharist. I’ve lost sight of its importance. And during communion I am asking myself questions like “Why do we even do this again? What does it mean?”

Have you tried asking Our Lord or even Our Lady these things in prayer? I would honestly take some time to do so. They always come through with some grace in a means you didn't expect.
"The Heart of Jesus is closer to you when you suffer, than when you are full of joy." - St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

Put not your trust in princes: In the children of men, in whom there is no salvation. - Ps. 145:2-3

"For there shall be a time, when they will not endure sound doctrine; but, according to their own desires, they will heap to themselves teachers, having itching ears: And will indeed turn away their hearing from the truth, but will be turned unto fables." - 2 Timothy 4:3-4
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