Introduction
#1
Dutch-speaking European. Slow bloomer. Truth seeker. Silence.

I'm in the early stages of really getting to know, and engage with, Catholicism. I was inspired by going to Mass a few months ago, in a different parish, for the first time in years and years, witnessing a more reverent service than I thought still existed in this part of the world. Most manifest was the immediate sense of home.

I hope to learn a lot from this website, a beautiful labour of love and faith. I'm also keen to get to know individual stories of spiritual life, on this forum as well as more broadly. I find them inspring and comforting. Among the important early revelations to me are the feeling of greatness to share in a common belief, and the immense power of Christ's presence. I was so deeply touched, and overcome with emotion, when, in his homily, our parish priest articulated the notion that, if you accept Christ into your life, you will never truly be alone. This is life-changing.

I think contemporary society is lost in its own mind and self, but should and could heal by revaluing tradition and religion, by being observant and attentive to the nature of things.
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#2
Welcome to the Tank. I hope you enjoy your swim!
Jovan-Marya of the Immaculate Conception Weismiller, T.O.Carm.

Vive le Christ-roi! Vive le roi, Louis XX!
Deum timete, regem honorificate.
Kansan by birth! Albertan by choice! Jayhawk by the Grace of God!
  “Qui me amat, amet et canem meum. (Who loves me will love my dog also.)” 
St Bernard of Clairvaux

My Blog 'Musings of an Old Curmudgeon'


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#3
Make yourself at home here.
In the end my Immaculate Heart will triumph.
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#4
Hello and welcome to FishEaters!
:monstrance:Deo Gratias et Ave Maria! :monstrance:
Pray the Rosary

A Dieu mon ame,
Mon arme au roi,
Mon Coeur a la dame,
Mon honneur a moi!
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#5
Welcome! This website changed my life.


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#6
(05-03-2020, 01:41 AM)Lambert Wrote: Dutch-speaking European. Slow bloomer. Truth seeker. Silence.
Welcome, and I am interested as I am sure others here are at your experiences growing up, I presume, in at least one of the Low Countries post-V2, as I assume that the cultural changes from experimentation and innovation were mighty. The storm that washed over so many of us elsewhere in the West may have taken a bit longer to travel from the heart of the homeland for liturgical movements and theological voices that for the twentieth century had already been gaining power.
The deeds you do may be the only sermon some people may hear today (Francis of Assisi); Win an argument, lose a soul (Fulton Sheen)
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#7
Well, Belgium in the nineties was very much a secular and uprooted society, and the meaning of Catholicism had long shifted from faith per se to social work. In my mind, regular churchgoing was something for the elderly or people habituated by their upbringing and family peculiarities - the firm.

I gather from older parishioners, who were mere boys in the sixties, that the immediate period after Vatican II was one of shock and confusion. People had to change their ways, were told to change their ways, based on a sudden command from outside. There had been, in any case, no popular demand for these kind of changes. Though, in a wider context, the Church had already been losing power and influence since the 19th century.

One of the things I've been thinking about in these last few months is the message of the contemporary Church and the measure in which it succeeds to convince. I had my own particular way to find a home in the Church, and I can understand why so many today fail to grasp the story that, nonetheless, must, and wants to, be told. If only the distance between materialism and Truth could be more clearly and easily bridged. There seems to be a great many people who believe in some sort of unexpressed unknown, feeling or being.
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#8
(05-05-2020, 02:45 PM)Lambert Wrote: If only the distance between materialism and Truth could be more clearly and easily bridged. There seems to be a great many people who believe in some sort of unexpressed unknown, feeling or being.
Thanks for your insights; my wife, non-Christian and secular in outlook, confided to me today that despite never having given any credence to "hippy-dippy New Age" suppositions, felt that there's a strange psychic energy about now; my stepfather died last month and two family friends, one yesterday, a pedestrian hit by a (more common the less traffic) speeding car--a kid in a $$$ McLaren racer. This whole situation, of life on "pause button" for many of us as we adjust our work (or lack) and life is unsettling. Like many on FE and beyond, the distance enforced from sacraments and communal worship we feel keenly.

And I aver that the billions out there who don't profess a conventional belief system may also be feeling their own loss?
The deeds you do may be the only sermon some people may hear today (Francis of Assisi); Win an argument, lose a soul (Fulton Sheen)
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#9
I'm sorry to hear about your losses. That's a lot of grief to contend with in a short time!

And you're right. These are such anxious and disorienting times. I suppose it's in these, and even more, chaotic conditions trust in God or peaceable order shapes into being.

You'd be a fool to endlessly, incessantly labour and suffer towards controling fate. The boulder will always run down again.
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