How is everyone going to confession?
#21
A parish 60 miles from my parish opened up confession, not mass, just confession and adoration. St. Joseph's in Salem Oregon, only 10 at a time, wear mask, and clean your seats. Went yesterday.
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#22
Tomorrow I'll probably be doing the 3-hour round trip. Called two local parishes, one pawned me off to the other, the other one never called back. My priest just had a major surgery, so I'm not even bothering putting him in the uncomfortable position of having to say no due to possible health risk. Another nearby pastor passed away recently, so that parish is no longer an option.
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#23
Our parish is open and functioning, so there is confession on Saturdays prior to Vespers, and Sundays prior to liturgy, also on Wednesday and Friday prior to liturgies.  Confession has always been available by appointment.  Weekday liturgies are inside; Sunday liturgies are outside to accommodate the number of people.
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#24
Has anyone been refused the sacrament of penance ?
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#25
(05-10-2020, 05:21 PM)Eric F Wrote: Has anyone been refused the sacrament of penance ?

Not outright refused, but I did get the response of "well, call that other parish first, and if he can't do it, try me again."  I called the other parish, left a message, and never got a call back.   I just wound up making the 3-hour round trip to the closest church holding drive-through confessions because I knew they'd be there without having to make an appointment or wondering if someone would return my message.
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#26
Right now, I'm living in an Oriental Orthodox seminary as a guest while doing studies at a university. We have a lockdown situation here, so, under the terms of an ecumenical agreement from the 1970s between the Syriac Orthodox Patriarch of Antioch and the Papacy, this qualifies as a situation of pastoral necessity according to my Catholic priest here. The theology of the Syriac tradition does not distinguish between sins requiring confession and those which are absolved through general absolution given at the end of the liturgy before partaking of the Eucharist.

As soon as the lockdown situation is lifted (we also have additional restrictions imposed upon us for the safety of the seminary community, which includes some older and frail people), I will go to a Catholic priest for confession.
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#27
(05-11-2020, 04:43 PM)Cyriacus Wrote: Right now, I'm living in an Oriental Orthodox seminary as a guest while doing studies at a university. We have a lockdown situation here, so, under the terms of an ecumenical agreement from the 1970s between the Syriac Orthodox Patriarch of Antioch and the Papacy, this qualifies as a situation of pastoral necessity according to my Catholic priest here. The theology of the Syriac tradition does not distinguish between sins requiring confession and those which are absolved through general absolution given at the end of the liturgy before partaking of the Eucharist.

As soon as the lockdown situation is lifted (we also have additional restrictions imposed upon us for the safety of the seminary community, which includes some older and frail people), I will go to a Catholic priest for confession.

That's interesting about the agreement between the Syriacs and Rome for pastoral necessity.  Do you know if this agreement is with all Oriental Orthodox, or just the Syriac church specifically?

I've always had the impression that the Oriental Orthodox were friendlier towards Rome than the Eastern Orthodox, has this been your experience as well?  I do not know if we have similar agreements with any of the Eastern Orthodox churches on pastoral necessity, but I've had a few Orthodox tell me that their position is, at least unofficially, that their priests would not give sacraments to Catholics, even on the deathbed, without at least some presumption of intent to convert to Orthodoxy.
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#28
(05-11-2020, 05:11 PM)Melkite Wrote:
(05-11-2020, 04:43 PM)Cyriacus Wrote: Right now, I'm living in an Oriental Orthodox seminary as a guest while doing studies at a university. We have a lockdown situation here, so, under the terms of an ecumenical agreement from the 1970s between the Syriac Orthodox Patriarch of Antioch and the Papacy, this qualifies as a situation of pastoral necessity according to my Catholic priest here. The theology of the Syriac tradition does not distinguish between sins requiring confession and those which are absolved through general absolution given at the end of the liturgy before partaking of the Eucharist.

As soon as the lockdown situation is lifted (we also have additional restrictions imposed upon us for the safety of the seminary community, which includes some older and frail people), I will go to a Catholic priest for confession.

That's interesting about the agreement between the Syriacs and Rome for pastoral necessity.  Do you know if this agreement is with all Oriental Orthodox, or just the Syriac church specifically?

I've always had the impression that the Oriental Orthodox were friendlier towards Rome than the Eastern Orthodox, has this been your experience as well?  I do not know if we have similar agreements with any of the Eastern Orthodox churches on pastoral necessity, but I've had a few Orthodox tell me that their position is, at least unofficially, that their priests would not give sacraments to Catholics, even on the deathbed, without at least some presumption of intent to convert to Orthodoxy.
It's very interesting.  It sort of implies that there's a real communion.  Oriental Orthodox to my knowledge have a different Christology (not according to academics though) compared to Chalcedonian Orthodox and Roman Catholics so that would be weird.  The Christological differences are not just academic points of interest, all true theology is in some way integrally related to Christology. The early Church had whole councils specifically on Christological controversy.  I know modern academics tend to dismiss the differences as semantic only but I'm not so convinced.  At any rate it's interesting.  It implies that the Christology of non Chalcedonians and RC's are exactly the same or that Christology isn't an issue when it comes to communion or at least confession.
Walk before God in simplicity, and not in subtleties of the mind. Simplicity brings faith; but subtle and intricate speculations bring conceit; and conceit brings withdrawal from God. -Saint Isaac of Syria, Directions on Spiritual Training


"It is impossible in human terms to exaggerate the importance of being in a church or chapel before the Blessed Sacrament as often and for as long as our duties and state of life allow. I very seldom repeat what I say. Let me repeat this sentence. It is impossible in human language to exaggerate the importance of being in a chapel or church before the Blessed Sacrament as often and for as long as our duties and state of life allow. That sentence is the talisman of the highest sanctity. "Father John Hardon
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#29
(05-11-2020, 05:42 PM)formerbuddhist Wrote: It's very interesting.  It sort of implies that there's a real communion.  Oriental Orthodox to my knowledge have a different Christology (not according to academics though) compared to Chalcedonian Orthodox and Roman Catholics so that would be weird.  The Christological differences are not just academic points of interest, all true theology is in some way integrally related to Christology. The early Church had whole councils specifically on Christological controversy.  I know modern academics tend to dismiss the differences as semantic only but I'm not so convinced.  At any rate it's interesting.  It implies that the Christology of non Chalcedonians and RC's are exactly the same or that Christology isn't an issue when it comes to communion or at least confession.

Are miaphysitism and dyophysitism reconcilable? If so, it sounds like the OOs are no longer what they once were - if they ever were truly monophysites at all. I'm not very familiar with the history on this issue, though.
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#30
The agreement is specifically between the Syriac Orthodox Church only and the Catholic Church. With the other Oriental Orthodox churches, things are much more complicated. The Copts specifically have a cadre of hardliner bishops who refuse to acknowledge the validity (!) of Catholic baptism. But within the Syriac Orthodox Church, there is, on the whole, a remarkable degree of openness. You will see, for example, Catholic religious art in the parishes and will even see paintings of specifically Catholic saints that have become popular in devotional life among the Orthodox, e.g., St. Charbel Makhlouf.

Part of this, I think, is due to the relative smallness of the church and an overall weakness of institutions that might otherwise be very assertive of their own particularity, but it also has something to do with the community's self-identification as Christian in a Muslim context; although they have their own distinct liturgical life, spirituality, and practices that set them apart in some ways, they are acutely aware of themselves as Christians and part of a broader community of Christians. In the imagination of an Aramaean Christian living in southeastern Turkey, Europe and America are Christian places (or were until recently), and he is already accustomed to thinking of the Armenians, despite their differences, as belonging to a sister church. To the extent that they have a bone to pick, it is mostly against the Church of the East for historical reasons (loathing Nestorius and those who would associate with his name and legacy), and secondarily against those churches that in contemporary times conduct active work trying to convert Middle Eastern Christians to various forms of evangelicalism and such (e.g., Jehovah's Witnesses).

In spite of doctrinal differences, specifically Chalcedonian saints still found their way into manuscripts of church calendars from Syriac Orthodox sources, e.g., those of particular monasteries or dioceses.
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