Question about Thomistic Philosophy and Evolution.
#51
(05-10-2020, 06:12 PM)MagisterMusicae Wrote: Yes. That was what I threw out much earlier on as regards Theological Evolutionism. Things have a particular nature which is what makes them unique from other things. It is that "form" or formal cause which distinguishes this animal from that. It would be just as repugnant for a cow to give birth to a monkey. Kind begets kind.

Can the form not change? If an animal gives birth to offspring which have one tiny mutation, it's still the same animal. If that continues for a million years, each generation changing only very slightly, wouldn't it still be the same nature even if the latest generation looks nothing like the one that lived a million years ago?

If so, what if Adam's mother was physically human except for having a rational soul? Or does the physical makeup of the human body depend on the rational soul?
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#52
(05-10-2020, 10:17 PM)Paul Wrote:
(05-10-2020, 06:12 PM)MagisterMusicae Wrote: Yes. That was what I threw out much earlier on as regards Theological Evolutionism. Things have a particular nature which is what makes them unique from other things. It is that "form" or formal cause which distinguishes this animal from that. It would be just as repugnant for a cow to give birth to a monkey. Kind begets kind.

Can the form not change? If an animal gives birth to offspring which have one tiny mutation, it's still the same animal. If that continues for a million years, each generation changing only very slightly, wouldn't it still be the same nature even if the latest generation looks nothing like the one that lived a million years ago?

If so, what if Adam's mother was physically human except for having a rational soul? Or does the physical makeup of the human body depend on the rational soul?

The substantial form of a creature cannot change, because it defines what a creature is.

The human creature is defined by the Scholastics as a "rational animal." So having a beast with a similar physiology but no rationality does not constitute a human being in the formal sense.

Again, we fall into the error of philosophical dualism if we state that the human body physically developed before being endowed with a rational soul. It creates a logical disconnect between body and soul which is contrary to the Christian conception of the hypostasis.
"The Heart of Jesus is closer to you when you suffer, than when you are full of joy." - St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

Put not your trust in princes: In the children of men, in whom there is no salvation. - Ps. 145:2-3

"For there shall be a time, when they will not endure sound doctrine; but, according to their own desires, they will heap to themselves teachers, having itching ears: And will indeed turn away their hearing from the truth, but will be turned unto fables." - 2 Timothy 4:3-4
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