Should I get a Master's in theology?
#11
(06-09-2020, 10:02 AM)austenbosten Wrote: You live in Japan and teach ESL.  So, I'm guessing you probably speak and know Japanese.  Have you considered a career in translation in the States?  There are people I know who work for Japanese companies in the US (or vice-versa) as translators and make a decent living from it.

For the record, none of us truly know what the hell we are doing.  We pick a career we like (or are competent and can tolerate) punch in our 40 hours a week and collect a paycheck.
Actually, my Japanese is atrocious. I can barely speak anything beyond ordering a beer and a few plates of food at a restaurant and my reading and writing skills are next to nothing. Surprisingly, you can survive in Japan with next to no Japanese and many of the "teachers" who work here are in the same boat in that regard. So, unfortunately, translation is not a real option for me.

And I know that most people just do what they can to make a living, but I would at least like to know what I'm competent at or like. I already know what I can't tolerate and dislike. I just want to do something that's more than just a daily grind, something that gives me purpose and fulfillment. But like you say, we're all searching for that.

Edit: typo
Omnia et in omnibus Christus
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#12
(06-09-2020, 06:22 PM)whitewashed_tomb Wrote: Actually, my Japanese is atrocious. I can barely speak anything beyond ordering a beer and a few plates of food at a restaurant and my reading and writing skills are next to nothing. Surprisingly, you can survive in Japan with next to no Japanese and many of the "teachers" who work here are in the same boat in that regard. So, unfortunately, translation is not a real option for me.

Yeah, a good friend of mine from university taught EFL in Japan. When he arrived there after teaching in Saudi Arabia he spoke no Japanese. I'm sure he's picked it up tho', since he married a Japanese girl he met at uni in the States. She inherited her father's business and they've spent the last 40+ years in the country.
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#13
Are you coming back to the US? Have you considered teaching in a Catholic school? You can probably teach here with your credentials (although I'm not sure of all the requirements), and help out with school theology programs along the way.
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#14
(06-09-2020, 06:22 PM)whitewashed_tomb Wrote: And I know that most people just do what they can to make a living, but I would at least like to know what I'm competent at or like. I already know what I can't tolerate and dislike. I just want to do something that's more than just a daily grind, something that gives me purpose and fulfillment. But like you say, we're all searching for that.

Edit: typo

I don't have any answers for you but I'm in pretty much the same boat as you man, it's a very frustrating position. I'm just trying to get by day to day and trying to follow the will of God, I trust that he has a plan for us.
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#15
(06-09-2020, 09:12 PM)LionHippo Wrote: Are you coming back to the US?  Have you considered teaching in a Catholic school?  You can probably teach here with your credentials (although I'm not sure of all the requirements), and help out with school theology programs along the way.
He doesn't know what he wants to do with his life. You shouldn't direct people in such a state to become teachers because students need to be able to look up to their teachers.
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#16
(06-09-2020, 09:18 PM)Bombero Wrote:
(06-09-2020, 09:12 PM)LionHippo Wrote: Are you coming back to the US?  Have you considered teaching in a Catholic school?  You can probably teach here with your credentials (although I'm not sure of all the requirements), and help out with school theology programs along the way.
He doesn't know what he wants to do with his life. You shouldn't direct people in such a state to become teachers because students need to be able to look up to their teachers.

I mean, if I were to be a teacher, I'm sure there'd be plenty about me for students to look up to without my being 100% certain about my life...

Edit: After all, I'm a teacher in Japan now & I'm pretty sure at least some of my Japanese students look up to me, in spite of my imperfections and uncertainties.
Omnia et in omnibus Christus
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#17
(06-09-2020, 09:27 PM)whitewashed_tomb Wrote: I mean, if I were to be a teacher, I'm sure there'd be plenty about me for students to look up to without my being 100% certain about my life...

Edit: After all, I'm a teacher in Japan now & I'm pretty sure at least some of my Japanese students look up to me, in spite of my imperfections and uncertainties.

Don't get me wrong as I am not saying that you aren't a good guy in other respects. I'm more so saying that you should only be a teacher if you know that teaching is your calling. Think about it. Would you want your children to have a teacher who doesn't know where he's supposed to be? Or a teacher that is certain that teaching is his profession?
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#18
(06-09-2020, 09:12 PM)LionHippo Wrote: Are you coming back to the US?  Have you considered teaching in a Catholic school?  You can probably teach here with your credentials (although I'm not sure of all the requirements), and help out with school theology programs along the way.
Yes, I will be returning to the US soon. I have considered teaching in a Catholic school. To do that, I would need a teaching credential, which I don't have (no credential or teaching experience was required for my current job). So, if I was serious about being a teacher, I'd have to go back to school for one year to get a credential, which is definitely doable and it wouldn't be extremely expensive (I'd probably still have to take out a loan, though). But I'm still not fully certain about taking the teaching route.

It's the most obvious career trajectory I can take, given my education and experience, and I know I enjoy teaching well enough, yet it's just that the education system in America (likely even within many Catholic schools) intimidates me in regards to student behavior and lack of discipline (even the most unruly Japanese students are angels compared to the horror stories of students in the US) and the leftist ideology and politics rampant in the curriculum and education culture.
Omnia et in omnibus Christus
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#19
(06-09-2020, 11:46 PM)Bombero Wrote:
(06-09-2020, 09:27 PM)whitewashed_tomb Wrote: I mean, if I were to be a teacher, I'm sure there'd be plenty about me for students to look up to without my being 100% certain about my life...

Edit: After all, I'm a teacher in Japan now & I'm pretty sure at least some of my Japanese students look up to me, in spite of my imperfections and uncertainties.

Don't get me wrong as I am not saying that you aren't a good guy in other respects. I'm more so saying that you should only be a teacher if you know that teaching is your calling. Think about it. Would you want your children to have a teacher who doesn't know where he's supposed to be? Or a teacher that is certain that teaching is his profession?
I don't disagree with your reasoning and of course I would want a dedicated, passionate teacher for my children, but, in the end, teaching is a job much like all jobs that people take for a variety of reasons, not simply because it's their "calling." I'm not entirely convinced that everyone even has a calling. Undeniably, the education system would be better if every teacher was certain that teaching is their calling. But then we'd have much fewer teachers.
Omnia et in omnibus Christus
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#20
Poorly-taught theology courses are a nightmare. It's better, somehow, to find people with whom you can learn and grow. Visit places and people, go on retreats. Find traditional religious communities, visit, perhaps try out a postulancy or become a tertiary. If you find that the academy has an appeal, go to lectures and other events, which are often open to the public, on things that matter for you. Strike up friendships with people who want to share.
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