Teen-Patron St. of the Net?
#1
I cut and paste the entire article in case it's behind a paywall. Despite the snarky tone, it's news I had not heard before.

A Patron Saint of the Internet? The Pope Is On It.
By Tom Kington
June 28, 2020

The good news for anyone praying for a little less online vitriol or a much faster internet connection is that the Vatican is on the case.
Showing that it has one foot in the 21st century, the ancient institution is backing a 15-year-old computer whiz to become the first patron saint of the internet.
Carlo Acutis, an Italian schoolboy who helped spread Roman Catholic teaching online before he died of leukemia in 2006, is the perfect candidate to become the protector of web surfers, said Cardinal Angelo Becciu, the head of the Vatican’s saint-making department.
“That’s my hope — he would be an ideal example for all young people,” said Becciu, whose official title is head of the Congregation for the Causes of Saints.
Carlo became deeply religious during his middle-class childhood in Milan and would donate his pocket money to the city’s poor residents.
Crucially, he used his prodigious coding talent to set up websites for priests. At the age of 10, he began to create an online exhibit about religious miracles, which has gained huge popularity since his death.
Hundreds of parishes around the world have printed off material from the site to create real-life exhibits of their own.

Last year, Pope Francis paid tribute to the teenager, declaring that his use of the internet to “communicate values and beauty” was the perfect antidote to the dangers of social media. In a document he wrote after a synod on youth, Francis quoted a phrase coined by Carlo warning other youngsters not to lose their individuality on the internet: “Everyone is born an original, but many die like photocopies.”
After citing the phrase, Francis added, “Don’t let this happen.”
As Carlo’s fame has spread, Catholics have started to pray to him, and in February, the pope attributed a miracle to the teen, triggering his beatification, the first step toward being made a saint. The beatification ceremony will be held Oct. 10 in the central Italian city of Assisi (of St. Francis fame).

The miracle in 2013 involved the rapid and inexplicable healing of a 6-year-old Brazilian boy suffering from a serious congenital deformation of the pancreas. A priest prayed to Carlo on the child’s behalf.
“The boy was vomiting and risked dying. Then, on the third day of prayers, he started eating,” said Antonia Salzano, Carlo’s mother, who works in publishing. His father works in the insurance business.
“We get news of miracles attributed to Carlo all the time,” said Salzano, 53. “One woman was cured of her cancer after attending his funeral, and I heard of two more a few days ago.”
She added that she could not fathom how Carlo’s fame had spread since his death. “It’s a mystery. I sense the finger of God,” she said. “Losing your son is the most terrible thing, but we are happy he is helping people discover their faith.”

Salzano recalled that Carlo had only “a very basic computer” but that he would study college textbooks to learn how to program and “saw the internet as a way to spread the faith.”
This month, Becciu told Vatican News that, when he was close to death, Carlo had said: “I want to offer all my suffering for the Lord, for the pope and for the church. I don’t want to do purgatory; I want to go straight to heaven.”
The cardinal added: “He said that at 15! A little boy who talks like that strikes us, and I think it encourages everyone not to joke with our faith, but to take it seriously.”
To make it easier to pray at his tomb, the Vatican ordered Carlo’s body to be exhumed last year and reburied at the Shrine of Renunciation at the Church of St. Mary Major in Assisi.Further miracles attributed to prayers to Carlo will be studied by the Vatican. If it certifies a second miracle after Carlo’s beatification in October, the youth can be made a saint.
If that happens, Carlo would be a strong candidate to become patron saint of the internet, Becciu said, but “the pope decides.”
Declaring a patron saint for web surfers — actual surfers already have a protector out on the waves, St. Christopher — would be in keeping with the Vatican’s push to promote an online presence. The pope’s digital outreach efforts include his popular Twitter accounts, which boast more than 50 million followers, including 900,000 of his feed in Latin.
Catholic priests around the world turned to Zoom during coronavirus lockdowns to hold online services when churches were closed.

Francis has described the internet as a “gift from God” but has also warned that hours spent alone online “can have the effect of isolating us from our neighbors, from those closest to us.” In 2016, he said nuns should be allowed to surf the internet in their convents but should not let online time become “occasions for wasting
time or escaping from the demands of fraternal life in community.”
If he declares Carlo the patron saint of the internet, Francis will probably cast the boy as a figure who can steer users away from loneliness and turn their surfing into a social, life-affirming experience.
In recent years, some reports have contended that the Catholic Church already has a patron saint of all things digital: Isidore, the 6th century bishop of Seville who created a 20-volume encyclopedia in a bid to put all knowledge in one place — a precursor of Google.
Press reports have said that Pope John Paul II declared him the saint of the web.
The deeds you do may be the only sermon some people may hear today (Francis of Assisi); Win an argument, lose a soul (Fulton Sheen)
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#2
Here is more...at an eponymous website.
https://carloacutis-en.org/
And on the miracle:
https://aleteia.org/2019/11/16/medical-c...lo-acutis/
The deeds you do may be the only sermon some people may hear today (Francis of Assisi); Win an argument, lose a soul (Fulton Sheen)
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#3
This is great to read. I had seen his image before, but I didn't realize he was almost a Blessed. It really gives me hope to see a kid so dedicated to the Eucharist while spreading the faith in such a simple way to have attained his eternal reward.
"The Heart of Jesus is closer to you when you suffer, than when you are full of joy." - St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

"modern Catholics have tended to put too much faith in the pope and too little in the Church." - Bishop Williamson.
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#4
Although I am sure he was very holy, it seems suspicious for a cause to be at this stage when the person was born after me.  The line from the article "showing that it has one foot in the 21st century..." really says a lot.
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#5
(06-28-2020, 04:41 PM)Fionnchu Wrote: I cut and paste the entire article in case it's behind a paywall. Despite the snarky tone, it's news I had not heard before.

A Patron Saint of the Internet? The Pope Is On It.
By Tom Kington
June 28, 2020

The good news for anyone praying for a little less online vitriol or a much faster internet connection is that the Vatican is on the case.
Showing that it has one foot in the 21st century, the ancient institution is backing a 15-year-old computer whiz to become the first patron saint of the internet.
Carlo Acutis, an Italian schoolboy who helped spread Roman Catholic teaching online before he died of leukemia in 2006, is the perfect candidate to become the protector of web surfers, said Cardinal Angelo Becciu, the head of the Vatican’s saint-making department.
“That’s my hope — he would be an ideal example for all young people,” said Becciu, whose official title is head of the Congregation for the Causes of Saints.
Carlo became deeply religious during his middle-class childhood in Milan and would donate his pocket money to the city’s poor residents.
Crucially, he used his prodigious coding talent to set up websites for priests. At the age of 10, he began to create an online exhibit about religious miracles, which has gained huge popularity since his death.
Hundreds of parishes around the world have printed off material from the site to create real-life exhibits of their own.

Last year, Pope Francis paid tribute to the teenager, declaring that his use of the internet to “communicate values and beauty” was the perfect antidote to the dangers of social media. In a document he wrote after a synod on youth, Francis quoted a phrase coined by Carlo warning other youngsters not to lose their individuality on the internet: “Everyone is born an original, but many die like photocopies.”
After citing the phrase, Francis added, “Don’t let this happen.”
As Carlo’s fame has spread, Catholics have started to pray to him, and in February, the pope attributed a miracle to the teen, triggering his beatification, the first step toward being made a saint. The beatification ceremony will be held Oct. 10 in the central Italian city of Assisi (of St. Francis fame).

The miracle in 2013 involved the rapid and inexplicable healing of a 6-year-old Brazilian boy suffering from a serious congenital deformation of the pancreas. A priest prayed to Carlo on the child’s behalf.
“The boy was vomiting and risked dying. Then, on the third day of prayers, he started eating,” said Antonia Salzano, Carlo’s mother, who works in publishing. His father works in the insurance business.
“We get news of miracles attributed to Carlo all the time,” said Salzano, 53. “One woman was cured of her cancer after attending his funeral, and I heard of two more a few days ago.”
She added that she could not fathom how Carlo’s fame had spread since his death. “It’s a mystery. I sense the finger of God,” she said. “Losing your son is the most terrible thing, but we are happy he is helping people discover their faith.”

Salzano recalled that Carlo had only “a very basic computer” but that he would study college textbooks to learn how to program and “saw the internet as a way to spread the faith.”
This month, Becciu told Vatican News that, when he was close to death, Carlo had said: “I want to offer all my suffering for the Lord, for the pope and for the church. I don’t want to do purgatory; I want to go straight to heaven.”
The cardinal added: “He said that at 15! A little boy who talks like that strikes us, and I think it encourages everyone not to joke with our faith, but to take it seriously.”
To make it easier to pray at his tomb, the Vatican ordered Carlo’s body to be exhumed last year and reburied at the Shrine of Renunciation at the Church of St. Mary Major in Assisi.Further miracles attributed to prayers to Carlo will be studied by the Vatican. If it certifies a second miracle after Carlo’s beatification in October, the youth can be made a saint.
If that happens, Carlo would be a strong candidate to become patron saint of the internet, Becciu said, but “the pope decides.”
Declaring a patron saint for web surfers — actual surfers already have a protector out on the waves, St. Christopher — would be in keeping with the Vatican’s push to promote an online presence. The pope’s digital outreach efforts include his popular Twitter accounts, which boast more than 50 million followers, including 900,000 of his feed in Latin.
Catholic priests around the world turned to Zoom during coronavirus lockdowns to hold online services when churches were closed.

Francis has described the internet as a “gift from God” but has also warned that hours spent alone online “can have the effect of isolating us from our neighbors, from those closest to us.” In 2016, he said nuns should be allowed to surf the internet in their convents but should not let online time become “occasions for wasting
time or escaping from the demands of fraternal life in community.”
If he declares Carlo the patron saint of the internet, Francis will probably cast the boy as a figure who can steer users away from loneliness and turn their surfing into a social, life-affirming experience.
In recent years, some reports have contended that the Catholic Church already has a patron saint of all things digital: Isidore, the 6th century bishop of Seville who created a 20-volume encyclopedia in a bid to put all knowledge in one place — a precursor of Google.
Press reports have said that Pope John Paul II declared him the saint of the web.
Ah, Carlos' mother is in the publishing business...I sent an intercession request and received a unexpected package of quite alot of printed material, (+ a relic, thank you), which I did my best to distribute.

Its interesting to note even thought the boy being interceded for died he lived years further then the doctors expected him to; giving Ricky's family time to they themselves heal.

Thanks Carlos

https://carloacutis-en.org/
Oh, where are the snows of yesteryear!
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#6
Carlo, who said the Eucharist is the highway to heaven (read Michael Landon's Highway to Heaven was the inspiration), is such a holy child it's awfully tacty to constantly refer to him only as the patron of the internet. Augustine wrote with a quill so he's the patron of writing with a quill? 

It is interesting to note God's timing. Rather provincial.
Oh, where are the snows of yesteryear!
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#7
(07-09-2020, 06:37 PM)Blind Horus Wrote: Carlo, who said the Eucharist is the highway to heaven (read Michael Landon's Highway to Heaven was the inspiration), is such a holy child it's awfully tacty to constantly refer to him only as the patron of the internet. Augustine wrote with a quill so he's the patron of writing with a quill? 

It is interesting to note God's timing. Rather provincial.

Being a patron of something doesn't have to be completely applicable to their lives. For example, St. Bonaventure is the patron saint of bowel movements for some God-forsaken reason...
"The Heart of Jesus is closer to you when you suffer, than when you are full of joy." - St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

"modern Catholics have tended to put too much faith in the pope and too little in the Church." - Bishop Williamson.
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#8
Tongue 
(06-29-2020, 03:34 AM)Credidi Propter Wrote: Although I am sure he was very holy, it seems suspicious for a cause to be at this stage when the person was born after me.  The line from the article "showing that it has one foot in the 21st century..." really says a lot.


I know, the nerve of that kid!!!!
"Not only are we all in the same boat, but we are all seasick.” --G.K. Chesterton
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