Anyone have an interest in gardening?
#1
Is anyone here into gardening? If so, what resources do you look at? Podcast? Webpages? Magazines?

I personally like "David The Good". I find him down to earth and accessible. I also like Geoff Lawton.
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#2
I'm more the second-pair-of-hands. My wife is a fairly avid gardener. We have two raised beds, a Mary garden, et cetera. Castle Hill Garden is one of her faves. I'll see if I can raise some other recommendations for you.
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#3
(06-29-2020, 05:54 PM)dahveed Wrote: I'm more the second-pair-of-hands. My wife is a fairly avid gardener. We have two raised beds, a Mary garden, et cetera. Castle Hill Garden is one of her faves. I'll see if I can raise some other recommendations for you.

Thank you! I appreciate it.

I like the compost and vermicomposting parts of the job myself. There is something about take what nobody want and creating something out of it.

My wife handles the gardening part!
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#4
My husband is the heavy-lifter. If it weren't for him, I wouldn't be able to garden. Thanks for the recommendations, Mr. Rose.

I like the Wisconsin Gardener, mostly because we are zones 3 to 4.
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#5
Love gardening! Really into permaculture at the suburban/urban level. This is more focused on growing food and herbs for either medicinal or culinary use. The standard handbook is Gaia’s Garden. I have had great success following the methods it contains. We have started out with four 8x4 raised beds (20-inches tall), two 12x4 raised beds (6-inches tall), and a mounded bed about 8x8. I got my seeds from St Clare’s Seed Company and had a great germination rate on their small family pack, on everything except cantaloupe and watermelon. We’ve been replacing our lawn with nitrogen-fixing Dutch white clover using seeds from Urban Farmer. Also have gotten seeds from Terroir Seed Co (for some rarer, specific heirlooms).

Gardeners.com has some great free garden layout plans. So does Better Homes and Garden.

My husband built the raised beds (we cheaped out on the taller raised beds and used pine instead of cedar, instead spending on good quality compost, with plans to replace the boards in the future). He also built a seed starting shelf from plywood and 2x4’s, with hanging LED lights. That made a HUGE difference in the health of our plants and the neatness of the garden! He recently built arched trellises between the beds using PVC piping and coated wire screens. They’re bright blue, but they were cheap, and they look great covered in cucumbers! :D

A very handy web site for planting schedules is the Farmer’s Almanac.

I could go on and on about gardening if you have any specific interests or questions (my husband does the construction, but I do pretty much everything else in the garden because I worked as a landscaper for years and love it).
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#6
I subscribe to the quarterly Backwoods Home magazine which gives an overview of self-reliance and homesteading, including gardening.  There are lots of good beginner tips.
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#7
(06-30-2020, 08:17 PM)yablabo Wrote: I subscribe to the quarterly Backwoods Home magazine which gives an overview of self-reliance and homesteading, including gardening.  There are lots of good beginner tips.

Great magazine. I had a subscription that just ran out. Try to save money so I couldn't renew.
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#8
(06-30-2020, 03:27 PM)Elle19 Wrote: Love gardening! Really into permaculture at the suburban/urban level.

Thank you so much for sharing. I really appreciate it.

Permaculture is so interesting to me. I really love the idea of creating a food forest. It makes so much sense.

My wife and I have been trying to do things the more natural way. It's a little bit harder but it's worth it in the end. We juse never have enough resources to make lots of compost.
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#9
Quote:We juse never have enough resources to make lots of compost.

Around here in the Midwest, farmers complain they can never make enough silage. In a way, it's the same process, with a different result. ;-)

Where do you live, town or country? If you live in a rural setting, it is most efficient to put all your food scraps through a flock of chickens. Should you live in town, bury them directly (about six inches deep) in an unused garden bed covered with straw or leaves; you'll plant in this bed the following spring, after the worms have consumed everything.

If you can keep animals out of the bed go ahead and bury even meat scraps; if there'll be a problem, lay down a barrier--permeable plastic snow fencing should work. Add paper products too; these lighten your soil, help it hold moisture, and the worms love them.
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#10
(07-02-2020, 05:07 PM)Teresa Agrorum Wrote:
Quote:We juse never have enough resources to make lots of compost.

Around here in the Midwest, farmers complain they can never make enough silage. In a way, it's the same process, with a different result. ;-)

Where do you live, town or country? If you live in a rural setting, it is most efficient to put all your food scraps through a flock of chickens. Should you live in town, bury them directly (about six inches deep) in an unused garden bed covered with straw or leaves; you'll plant in this bed the following spring, after the worms have consumed everything.

If you can keep animals out of the bed go ahead and bury even meat scraps; if there'll be a problem, lay down a barrier--permeable plastic snow fencing should work. Add paper products too; these lighten your soil, help it hold moisture, and the worms love them.

That sounds like a good method.

Regarding the paper products with all the cardboard boxes we all are getting from ordering online we can get a lot of worms to go to work for us!  This guy who invented the cardboard method shows how:


Quote:Seeds of Solidarity Farmer Ricky Baruc offers his insights on the Cardboard Method, a low-tech, low-maintenance, high-productivity technique to enhance your soil and let you "Grow Food Everywhere!"


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The Church will be in eclipse

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Like Christ, His Bride the Church will undergo its own passion, burial, and resurrection.
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