Anyone have an interest in gardening?
#11
Yes, Baruc's ideas work; we used his method to build a weedless Mary garden for our granddaughter.
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#12
I'm in a loft now so only have an indoor garden.

I've put all of my plants in rockwool and leca for a hydroponic no soil method.

Some made the transition better than others so I'm still learning.

I want to start regrowing some of my veggies and herbs from the grocery store in pots indoors too!

Does anyone have experience with that?
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#13
(07-02-2020, 05:07 PM)Teresa Agrorum Wrote:
Quote:We just never have enough resources to make lots of compost.

Around here in the Midwest, farmers complain they can never make enough silage. In a way, it's the same process, with a different result. ;-)

Where do you live, town or country? If you live in a rural setting, it is most efficient to put all your food scraps through a flock of chickens. Should you live in town, bury them directly (about six inches deep) in an unused garden bed covered with straw or leaves; you'll plant in this bed the following spring, after the worms have consumed everything.

If you can keep animals out of the bed go ahead and bury even meat scraps; if there'll be a problem, lay down a barrier--permeable plastic snow fencing should work. Add paper products too; these lighten your soil, help it hold moisture, and the worms love them.

We live in a town just outside of a city. We are using our food scraps, coffee grinds, newspaper, and other things. You are right it is very helpful to just compost within the garden bed. We have seen some amazing results.

We don't have animals now. Our dream is to move back out to the country and continue with animals.

Have you ever seen the documentary, "Back to Eden"? The method he describes is what my wife and I used. Warning that the documentary is a little long winded but the guy is in love with God and gardening so I can get down with that.

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#14
(07-02-2020, 09:59 PM)Sacred Heart lover Wrote: I want to start regrowing some of my veggies and herbs from the grocery store in pots indoors too!

Does anyone have experience with that?

I don't have any experience other than starting our seedlings indoors. I'll have to look around for some methods that work for the indoors. I know that most of the plastic clam shell salad mixes in the grocery stores are mostly grown indoors using a deep coconut mulch that sit on top of running water.
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#15
We used a mixture of sheet mulching (basically lasagna gardening, we used cardboard, leaves, and straw) and hügelktur (fancy way of saying we composted in place with sticks hahahaha) for our beds. Being in a city, we are limited on space, but luckily we don’t have an HOA so in addition to the back and side yards we’ve even been (tastefully!—pun intended) growing veggies amongst the flowers in our front yard. Our neighbors have all thought it looks great! Chickens are illegal here, which is frustrating because I agree that is definitely an efficient way of getting nutrients back into the ground. And getting eggs. And chickens are funny. I digress!

I am very interested in watching that doc! A friend of mine had me watch the Biggest Little Farm on Hulu.

In additional to all the cardboard and wet leaves serving as effective mulch and weed block, I planted tomatoes with butternut squash and pumpkin in a couple beds and the vines are keeping everything else out. Just have to occasionally discourage them from climbing the tomatoes haha!
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#16
The documentary is beautiful. (Who minds longwindedness when the subject matter is so wonderful?)

Thanks for posting, Mr. Rose. In fact, you really ought to place this video in its own thread--you don't have to be gardening to appreciate it.
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#17
Quote:And chickens are funny.

They are a joy to watch. ;-)
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#18
(07-04-2020, 08:40 AM)Teresa Agrorum Wrote: The documentary is beautiful. (Who minds longwindedness when the subject matter is so wonderful?)

Thanks for posting, Mr. Rose. In fact, you really ought to place this video in its own thread--you don't have to be gardening to appreciate it.

Really? Thank you. I can post it in a different thread I just didn't think anyone would be interested in it.

Where do you think I should post it?
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#19
Quote:Where do you think I should post it?

We ought to have a forum called 'The Good, the Beautiful, and the True'.

Failing that, perhaps you might post it in 'Science'.
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#20
(07-06-2020, 10:46 PM)Teresa Agrorum Wrote:
Quote:Where do you think I should post it?

We ought to have a forum called 'The Good, the Beautiful, and the True'.

Failing that, perhaps you might post it in 'Science'.

LOL, it is posted in Science!
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