Fatima & The Great Conspiracy
#1
I have discovered this free online resource and have felt a visceral compulsion to share it. I will apologise in advance as, no doubt, it's been shared before and possibly been read by most on here. Please remember I am still new to Catholicism, but I am discovering remarkable things which are not widely reported.

http://www.fatimaandthegreatconspiracy.com/

I have only read seventeen pages, and learnt that England was known as The Dowry of Mary, which seems strange. Apparently it's been rededicated as such this year, in March. [1]

I have seen the Fatima apparitions referenced often, but I wasn't aware of their significance. With the neo-Marxist agitation in the US spreading around the world, I feel it may be particularly pertinent. 

I also had this video recommended to me, which is very interesting:




I'd be interested to read others' thoughts on Fatima. God bless you all.


[1] https://www.ctsbooks.org/product/the-dowry-of-mary/
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#2
I corresponded with Mrs Manifold before her death. She was a great lady. She also wrote several other books, including two on Marx, Karl Marx: True or False Prophet?, and Karl Marx: A Prophet of Our Times, which touch upon his early involvement with Satanism, and Towards World Government: New World Order, all of which are well worth reading.
Jovan-Marya of the Immaculate Conception Weismiller, T.O.Carm.

Vive le Christ-roi! Vive le roi, Louis XX!
Deum timete, regem honorificate.
Kansan by birth! Albertan by choice! Jayhawk by the Grace of God!
  “Qui me amat, amet et canem meum. (Who loves me will love my dog also.)” 
St Bernard of Clairvaux

My Blog 'Musings of an Old Curmudgeon'


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#3
An obituary of Mrs Manifold when she died at either 98 or 99 in 2013.


Deirdre Manifold RIP
(Link to original) May 31, 2013 

Deirdre MANIFOLD (1914 – 2013)
The Galway author and activist Deirdre Manifold died in mid-March last. She came to national prominence due to her five-year relationship with enfant terrible of Irish Literature, Patrick Kavanagh. Later on in life she became a Religious activist from her base in Salthill, Galway.

Deirdre Courtney was born in 1914 near Tuam, one of seven children (including stepchildren). Her father, a stone-mason had worked in Cincinnati in the US for twenty-three years and later met his Irish wife there. The family were pretty well-off and on return from the US, her father invested in a hill-farm in Tuam. He had been away from farming too long, however, and was unable to run it efficiently. Her mother ran the house but died when Deirdre was about nine years old.

She attended the local Convent in Tuam. After completing her Secondary education she moved to Dublin to first work with Iarnrod Eireann and then in the Civil Service. She found it difficult adjusting to City life. After a number of years in Dublin, she hadn’t met many people she’d much in common with and male friends were limited. She and a lady-friend joined the Legion of Mary and became dedicated members.


She had admired Patrick Kavanagh from afar through his writings in the Irish Press. Deirdre, being deeply religious, appreciated the mystical themes in Kavanagh’s writings. She never thought she’d meet him but was introduced to him through a friend at the end of 1949. They’d both experienced a hostile City – she was less than half his age but they hit it off like soul-mates!. They first met at the old Adelphi Café and continued on their first date to see the Cary Grant film ‘Every Girl Should be Married’. She subsequently accompanied Kavanagh on his many sojourns in Dublin. She told how she’d accompany him on his pub excursions to the likes of McDaid’s, The Bailey and the Baggot Inn but this cannot be independently verified. They spent five years together but Deirdre tried to keep their relationship private as she felt it would compromise her Legion activities.


In the early 50’s Deirdre and Kavanagh began spending more time together. She took exams, got into the Civil Service and gained promotion there. During this time Kavanagh was finding it harder to make ends meet. Throughout their relationship she often subsidised him from her modest salary in the Civil Service – her ‘starvation wages’, as she called them. She was instrumental in making approaches to get Kavanagh involved in the Cultural Relations Committee to represent Ireland abroad but Frank Aiken turned it down.


On reflection she felt there was a lot of tragedy about Kavanagh. There was no assistance for artists in those days and he wasted a lot of time penny-less and trying to eke out a living around the street of Dublin.


In mid-1954 she and a friend went on a short holiday to the Dingle peninsula, where they stayed in Kruger Kavanagh’s. She met her future husband, Limerick car-dealer, Willie Manifold there. He was a cultured man and they married three months later in 1955. She then, of course, had to leave the Civil Service because of the marriage ban at the time.


The Manifolds settled into married life in Limerick. They lived there for a good number of years and reared a young family. The family then moved permanently to Galway where they ran a car-hire business from Quay St.  Her husband, Willie suffered from poor health, however  and Deirdre spent a lot of time looking after him. This in time led the Manifolds to exit the car-hire business.  They later secured a contract with CIE to transport handicapped kids to school in mini-busses.


In late 1975 Deirdre found herself at the centre of a highly-publicized controversy when she convened a public rosary crusade in opposition to the Family Planning Assoc.  locating in Galway.  She was an influential opponent of contraception and she opened a ‘natural’ or Billings Clinic in her city-centre premises in the Spring of 1975. Amongst those supporting the family-planning clinic were Michael D. Higgins, then a UCG lecturer, and Eamon Gilmore, a graduate student !.


After the death of her husband in 1982 she took on the challenge of writing . Her books were mostly of a religious and economics nature.  She knew Legion of Mary founder, Frank Duff and follo
wed his advice ‘Take up a challenge, do your best and leave the rest to God’. There was a lot of opposition to her first book ‘Fatima and the Great Conspiracy’ (Galway, 1982), mainly from right-wing Catholics which hurt her greatly. This book was translated into French and Polish. After this she wrote Karl Marx: True or False Prophet (Galway, 1985) which was translated into French. Various editions of a book called Towards World Government – New World Order' were published between 1985 and 2004. She also wrote a novel on the Irish War of Independence,Towards Utopia’ (Galway, 1998). Her books were self-published by her own Fίrinne printing outfit. They weren’t widely distributed, however.


Her son, Joe died in 1990 after returning from a post in the US. In later years the family moved from Dalysfort Road to live in Rockbarton North, Salthill. Religion had always been an intrinsic part of Deirdre’s life and she regularly hosted a Latin Mass service on Sunday afternoons at her Salthill home. She was an avid reader and was subscribed to periodicals like Classic Family News and Hibernia. Her favourite Kavanagh book was Lapped Furrows, a copy of which she had in her sitting-room.


We did a number of interviews with her while researching ‘Deirdre’s Passions’, a short film on her life and found her to be intelligent, alert and a self-confident writer.


She became disillusioned with Politics and her beloved Church. She was very much a pioneer in her honest thinking and protestations in early 80’s Ireland. This writer queried her renowned picketing at controversial films and anti-Catholic publications. Her answer was to quote Edmund Burke ‘[i]All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing’[/i]!. We join with Galway in mourning one of it’s great daughters!.


She was predeceased by her loving sister, Babe (Margaret) Courtney a few weeks previously in March 2013 and she is survived by her extended family.


Ger Considine,,Galway.

Jovan-Marya of the Immaculate Conception Weismiller, T.O.Carm.

Vive le Christ-roi! Vive le roi, Louis XX!
Deum timete, regem honorificate.
Kansan by birth! Albertan by choice! Jayhawk by the Grace of God!
  “Qui me amat, amet et canem meum. (Who loves me will love my dog also.)” 
St Bernard of Clairvaux

My Blog 'Musings of an Old Curmudgeon'


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#4
(09-13-2020, 05:53 PM)jovan66102 Wrote: I corresponded with Mrs Manifold before her death. She was a great lady. She also wrote several other books, including two on Marx, Karl Marx: True or False Prophet?, and Karl Marx: A Prophet of Our Times, which touch upon his early involvement with Satanism, and Towards World Government: New World Order, all of which are well worth reading.

Wonderful! I will endeavour to read them, as I am really enjoying Fatima and the Great Conspiracy! Thank you.
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