Hello!
#1
I am one of those many transplants from CAF.  I'm not the progressive type often seen over there, and am striving to be an authentic, committed, and devout Catholic loyal to the Church in Rome.  But with CAF's upcoming closure, I wanted to find a new community.  Frankly, I never looked since CAF was so large and I knew so many there (I started there perhaps '03 or '04?).  I'm very glad to see there are other such forums and I wouldn't be forced into Twitter or Facebook.  Feel free to look me up on CAF (same username/avatar) if you want to learn more.

I have a deep fondness for the TLM, though I have only attended once.  Unfortunately where I live there isn't one anywhere nearby (within a a couple of hours).  Indeed, I have been working on teaching myself Latin, mostly inspired from my interest in the TLM.

Despite being raised as a "None"--indeed my father was quite antagonistic to all religions--in high school I started down a journey to Christianity at an Assembly of God.  I floated around throughout college between a few non-denominational churches, but dropped off after graduation.  Then in the big dot-com bust in 2002, I found myself unemployed and seeking.  Now with a mind much more sharply focused, I hit immediately upon the variance in beliefs.  I strongly resisted the Catholic Church, and started at Episcopalian and LCMS confirmation classes.  I had fallen in love with the liturgy (especially the Common Book of Prayer), but struggled to get my questions answered.  Too often the answer was "Whatever your heart tells you!"  And with the LCMS, the answers were unsatisfying, especially with respect to their communion.  I had no choice--investigate the Catholic Church.  It is a story for another day the trials to get through RCIA, but I can thank very much two books:  Karl Keating's (Boo!  Hiss!  I hear some of you!) _Catholicism and Fundamentalism__ and Fr John Hardon's _The Catholic Catechism: A Contemporary Catechism of the Teachings of the Catholic Church_.  Those two books helped me slog through the crazy RCIA instructors and priests to recognized the truth and beauty in the Catholic Church.

I'm anxious to come to a new forum community and meet new people, engage in dialog, and possibly escape the masses of heterodox I usually have to filter through.
To love for the sake of being loved is human;
  to love for the sake of loving is angelic.

-- Alphonse de Lamartine

Tiber Swim Team '04
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#2
Welcome, welcome! I think you’ll enjoy your stay here.
St. Joseph, Terror of Demons, Pillar of Families, Glory of Domestic Life, Pray for Us!

When I was a kid my parents moved a lot, but I always found them.
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#3
Welcome!  We were anticipating a sudden influx of CAF members. *{]:-)  Glad to have you here in the fish tank!
"There are not over a hundred people in the United States who hate the Catholic Church. There are millions, however, who hate what they wrongly believe to be the Catholic Church -- which is, of course, quite a different thing." -Ven. Archbishop Fulton J. Sheen

"Let me repeat this sentence. It is impossible in human language to exaggerate the importance of being in a chapel or church before the Blessed Sacrament as often and for as long as our duties and state of life allow. That sentence is the talisman of the highest sanctity." -Fr. John Hardon, S.J.
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#4
Glad you're here :)  I hope you -- and all newbies -- take the time to read this page, which is in the "Being Catholic" section of the FishEaters website: Traditional Catholicism 101: https://tinyurl.com/y9jz68no
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#5
(12-02-2020, 04:18 PM)VoxClamantis Wrote: Glad you're here :)  I hope you -- and all newbies -- take the time to read this page, which is in the "Being Catholic" section of the FishEaters website: Traditional Catholicism 101: https://tinyurl.com/y9jz68no

Thank you for the link.  It is quite a bit to digest.  And thus far, I've found myself in violent agreement.  I read through the first sections (up to the "The Revolution" section) and wanted to tell you my experience lines up very closely to what is written.  For example:

Quote:You do what most people do in this case; you call up your local parish and get enrolled in an R.C.I.A. program. You don't hear much about Mary, the other Saints, sin, Purgatory, or Hell. You hear very little about the Mass as a propitiatory Sacrifice, but instead hear it described only as a "celebratory meal." Depending on the parish you're in, you may hear and see things that seem totally contradictory to what you'd always heard the Catholic Church teaches. Your R.C.I.A. instructor may say things like, "The Catholic Church doesn't teach that any more since Vatican II" and may come off as religiously indifferent, not insistent enough that the Church is Christ's Church and that outside of Her there is no salvation.

This is almost exactly my experience in RCIA.  The first time I tried to go through it, there was a middle aged lady teaching the class.  The inevitable question came up, "Are we really barred from using contraception?"  You can guess the answer:  "That's something you need to discern yourself."  Or the related one, "Do I really have to go to confession if I miss mass?"  The answer didn't start with "If through no fault of your own ...."  Instead it was:  "That's something between you and God."

Now, I had already gone through *a lot* of research.  Indeed, I intentionally avoided the Catholic Church out of some notion that the Church was the "Whore of Babylon" (probably from my Assembly of God days and all my protestant friends).  But when I found every single answer was so self-centered, personal, and lacked any authority (i.e. "Well, that's how *I* understand the Bible."), I went farther back in history.  And as St John Henry Newman said, "To be deep in history is to cease to be Protestant."  There were only two choices left to consider:  the Catholic Church or the Orthodox Church.  Perhaps it is a happy accident of location or a gift of the Holy Spirit, but there were no Orthodox churches nearby.  So I dove into the reading the history of the Catholic Church and her teachings and was convinced.

So, I return to RCIA the next week with photocopies of the Catechism regarding contraception.  The instructor snatched them away and said "When *you* get a masters degree in theology, you can teach the class."  I was shocked.  I even called up Fr Pacwa on Catholic Answers open line telling him this story and asked what to do.  He said to keep my head down, jump through the hoops, get confirmed, then go get a masters degree in theology and take her job.  :)  Well, the next week the priest started attending.  Whenever I spoke up to clarify or ask questions, I got a not to subtle shaking of the head from the instructor and the priest.  It was clear why he was there--to keep the rabble quiet.  (On a side note, remember that time when some priests might wear the rainbow sashes in support of homosexuals?  Yeah, he was one of those who wore the sash, and gave homilies about the "injustices" they suffered due to the Church's stance on homosexuality.)  That was the last straw, and I quit.

So I did research on other parishes, and found one about 30 miles away (I lived in a remote part of Eastern WA at the time).  I started attending the next fall.  And guess what.  It was an older, retired priest, perhaps in his 70s, teaching RCIA.  When the same inevitable question about contraception came up, it was the same answer.  But now it was a priest, and it was in a different diocese.  So I followed Fr Pacwa's advice and just kept my head down and got confirmed.

I'm still at the same parish where I was confirmed.  There has been a significant transformation over the last 16 years.  We have an older pastor (the 3rd since the one that was there when I went through RCIA), but our parochial vicar is *very* traditional minded.  But he isn't rocking the boat too much.  In fact, when he first came in, he interspersed some Latin in our NO rite (using the proper prayer, but in Latin instead).  There was a huge amount of grumbling from the older crowd who like in the paragraph above said that Vatican II eliminated Latin and, quoting one older lady I heard grumbling after mass, "We don't want to go back to the dark ages like before Vatican II."  And that was just a *smidge* of Latin.  But those of us young-ish (say, under 50), loved it.  And we let him and our pastor know.  Our vicar has been given much more freedom.  He's instituted several things that we love:
  • Rorate masses
  • Daily adoration
  • Extended Christmas masses 100% in Latin (I'm unsure if they are NO, but I think it likely)
  • Expanded Confession times (now from 7am to noon on Sunday, during mass!)
  • Adding back in the prayer to St Michael after mass
  • Daily rosaries, including rosaries before every mass
  • A men's group that focuses on the virtues of of men and our role in the Church, the world, and our community, with a *heavy* emphasis on "authentic masculinity".
This kind of vigor I have never seen.  And the response has been tremendous.  Many of us have reached out and asked for him to do masses in the EF.  He, being an obedient priest, has asked us to get permission from the pastor and the bishop.  I emailed both, getting a response from neither.  But perhaps if enough of us ask, it will come to pass.
To love for the sake of being loved is human;
  to love for the sake of loving is angelic.

-- Alphonse de Lamartine

Tiber Swim Team '04
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#6
Thank God for your newest priest! And thank God that you were able to persevere through all that bad catechesis, sloppy liturgy, etc., that you encountered when entering the Church. God must have His eyes on you big time for you to be able to withstand all that madness. It's amazing really...
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#7
(12-02-2020, 08:08 PM)VoxClamantis Wrote: It's amazing really...
Your perspective has me introspective about things. Frankly, I thought I was just gung-ho and there was no way anyone was going to stop me from becoming Catholic. And your response now has me far more humble than I was soon afterward. I thought "I did it! I made it!" I should have been more thankful and less prideful, recognizing the influence of the Holy Spirit and all the saints in helping me through things.

Thanks for that.
To love for the sake of being loved is human;
  to love for the sake of loving is angelic.

-- Alphonse de Lamartine

Tiber Swim Team '04
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#8
Welcome to the forum. 
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