Which Catholic Bible?
#1
Hi,

Apologies in advance for my ignorance. 

I know if I want to be traditional the best Bible to get is the Vulgate. However, I'm looking for an English Bible so that I can actually read it - though I do plan to get the Vulgate for more in depth Bible study - but was wondering whether there have been changes since Vatican II. Of course I already have several Bibles, but they're not Catholic.
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#2
The Douai-Rheims is the go to 'Trad Bible'. I also like Msgr Knox's translation. I would avoid post-VII editions, not so much because of the translations, but because of questionable notes and commentary.
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#3
I have both DR and Knox's translation.  They're both great and I usually read Knox's.  It is in more modern English, while still retaining a great deal of beauty.  I also have a copy of two post-VII Bibles, the New Living Translation - Catholic Edition and the English Standard Version - Catholic Edition.  The notes are not, as far as I can tell, horrendous modernist or liberal spins on Scripture.  I'd feel comfortable recommending either for private Scripture reading.  The New American Bible isn't a bad translation, as far as I can tell, but the footnotes really are very liberal and slanted heavily in favor of using textual criticism to "reinterpret" traditional Catholic readings of the Bible.  That's too bad.  I also hear good things about the Revised Standard Version - Catholic Edition.  I have a copy, somewhere in my house.  I haven't studied it in depth.
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#4
(12-03-2020, 06:56 PM)Matthew7-7 Wrote: Hi,

Apologies in advance for my ignorance. 

I know if I want to be traditional the best Bible to get is the Vulgate. However, I'm looking for an English Bible so that I can actually read it - though I do plan to get the Vulgate for more in depth Bible study - but was wondering whether there have been changes since Vatican II. Of course I already have several Bibles, but they're not Catholic.

This edition has both the Vulgate and the Douay. It's pricey, though: https://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/...lfboutique
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#5
All translations have their strengths and weaknesses. While I do like the Douay-Rheims for reading aloud or some spiritual reading, I prefer the RSV2CE. I will admit, I think the D-R could be updated with some spelling changes that do not affect the text, such as Noe->Noah or Josue->Joshua, along with many place names; but that is just a minor quibble. For me, it can make the reading unnatural or clunky. Also, unless you have the Haydock edition of the D-R, the footnotes in most D-R Bibles are very sparse.

I prefer the RSV2CE Ignatius Study Bible editions, which all assert historical dating and authorship of the Bible, but give a balanced viewpoint against common, modern skepticism. The footnotes are very thorough, citing from the Catechism, Popes, Councils, Saints, etc.

One thing is certain: the NAB footnotes should not be consulted by anyone. Not just any Catholic - anyone. They're horrible.
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#6
As far as I'm aware the only 3 that I see "trads" trust are the Douay-Rheims, Revised Standard Version: 2nd Catholic Edition, and the Knox Translation.
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#7
(12-04-2020, 07:05 AM)LionHippo Wrote: I will admit, I think the D-R could be updated with some spelling changes that do not affect the text, such as Noe->Noah or Josue->Joshua, along with many place names; but that is just a minor quibble.

They're spelled the same as they are in the Vulgate, and many of those are taken directly from Greek - and the D-R is a translation of the Vulgate, not the Hebrew. It can take some getting used to, but it does set it apart from Protestant translations (and more modern Catholic ones), which I like.
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#8
My go to is the Douay-Rheims with notes by Bishop Challoner. I also have a "Textual Concordance of the Holy Scriptures" by T.D. Williams, DR Edition, that is often helpful.

I have a NAB that was gifted to me, but haven't cracked it in a while after I saw some rather untrustworthy notations in it and some of the English translations were too afar from the DR. I also have a KJV that belonged to a Protestant cousin of mine, since passed, that I only reference to see how badly the Masonic Bible has twisted Bible verse and meaning.
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#9
The Douay Rheims is the translation I prefer. I may at times refer to the RSV Catholic edition if need to but usually always Douay Rheims.
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