Divine Mercy: diary problem/ question
#41
(01-16-2021, 12:17 AM)XavierSem Wrote: From Crisis Magazine: "Praise for Gertrude can be found from the highest source. In the accounts of Gertrude’s life, Jesus Himself is reported to have provided testimony of her greatness: “I have borne [Gertrude] in my arms from her infancy … and she, by her own free choice and will, has given herself to Me entirely and forever. As a recompense for the perfection of her desires, I, in return, have given Myself entirely to her.” And further: “There is no creature on earth so dear to Me as Gertrude, because there is no one at this present time amongst mankind who is so closely united to Me by purity of intention and uprightness of will…. You can find Me in no place where I delight more, or which is more suitable to Me, than in the Sacrament of the Altar, and after that, in the heart and soul of Gertrude, My beloved.” Remember that Gertrude lived in the thirteenth century, a time of many great saints!" https://www.crisismagazine.com/2013/st-g...-greatness

The author does not source these quotes, so that presents an issue with authenticity. 

From a quick search they seem to come from an 1866 book of reflections about St Gertrude called The Spirit of St. Gertrude, but the book does not list any named author, nor does it appear to have an imprimatur, and presents unapproved vernacular devotional prayers (which is a big no no). It could be that my copy is missing the page with the imprimatur, but it does not appear to be missing any pages. 

The quotes shared by the crisis author are found therein, but the book also does not source these, despite putting them in quotes.

Of course, it is entirely possible that these quotes are authentic, but without an approved first-hand source, at best this is pious hearsay and only suggests a thread for investigation. It is not a definitive proof, lacking a first-hand source and imprimatur.

Could you please find that first-hand source?
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#42
There are icons of Jesus enthroned without His wounds, however I agree that adding in the wounds after the fact is still a good decision considering the white garments insinuate that this depiction of Christ is the Resurrected Christ.

As others are already arguing, it seems to me there is some level of precedent for Jesus to speak in this type of loving manner to the religious women he appears to.

I don’t really find these revelations that troubling. The prayers themselves definitely aren’t bad. The polemic regarding this replacing devotion to the Sacred Heart seems silly. One can pray to Our Lady of the Pillar, Guadalupe, Lourdes, La Salette, Fatima and appeal to Our Lady’s Immaculate Heart. One can appeal to both Our Lord’s Most Sacred Heart and His Divine Mercy.

This devotion doesn’t really have much of a presence in my family, but I think we have bigger fish to fry than stamping out this devotion.
Ave Christus Rex!
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#43
(01-17-2021, 01:16 PM)Some Guy Wrote: As others are already arguing, it seems to me there is some level of precedent for Jesus to speak in this type of loving manner to the religious women he appears to.

There might be, but every source I have seen, except The Diary  always seems to be second- or third-hand attributions, and not the reporting of the mystic himself or herself.

I do not doubt that Jesus does speak and comfort souls in such a manner. We do see such mercy towards sinners in the Gospel, but in most of the mystical writings I know of from the source, they tend, like St Mark's Gospel (which is a paraphrase of St Peter's catchetical discourses, so St Peter does not come off looking good), to emphasize the humility and lowness of the mystic, not the wonderous praise or gifts Jesus is giving them.

Again, that is not to say that Jesus does not give such gifts and comfort, but humble souls tend to be very careful not to speak about such personal graces, and instead to speak more of the humiliations and more penitential parts of what they received.

If a first-hand source (i.e. the mystic himself or herself) of an approved locution/apparition could be sourced in an imprimatured book, I would certainly see things in a different light. And, quite simply, I'd be happy to have that information, because one of my hang ups (aside from the prohibition by the CDF/Holy Office) is precisely these kind of statements.
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#44
I find this thread very interesting. Although I have little to contribute, I am enjoying the discussion immensely and check often for new replies.

I can relate to @MagisterMusicae. If I perceive an inconsistancy, I cant help but hone in. It may not be trying to stamp out a devotion as much as getting the pebble thats stuck in the craw.
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#45
Sung Divine Mercy Chaplet (in Song)- Donna Cori


This is what I think of when I hear Divine Mercy - a simple beautiful prayer for complicated confusing times (usually sung by a woman?) when a lot of people slough off prayer altogether (you could sing this on your drive to work.) Fit for purpose

On the other hand the Litany to the Sacred Heart: suitable for horseback (I could see myself holding the reins in one hand and a book in the other telling this to the horse in simpler times:)


I'm really thinking the Great Depression of the 1930s was a manufactured event to move people from the farm to the factory. It did culminate in 1941 with mass enlistments of men, and women picking up the slack in the huge workforce needed for the war effort - which begs the question: what are they planning next?

By the way - the purpose of the craw is to hold pebbles
Oh, where are the snows of yesteryear!
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#46
(01-18-2021, 02:20 AM)Blind Horus Wrote: By the way - the purpose of the craw is to hold pebbles

Hmmm ... Im pretty sure the purpose of the craw (crop) is to temporarily hold food. The pebbles and grit are supposed to pass through the crop to be utilized in the gizzard and act as teeth. When the pebbles are too large, they get stuck resulting in an impacted crop.

I have chickens but that doesnt make me an expert in bird anatomy, so I could be wrong!

Regardless, I was using the phrase as an Idiom.

STICK IN ONE'S CRAW - "When you can't swallow something, when it won't go down, or you are loath to accept it, it sticks in your craw. The craw is the crop or preliminary stomach of a fowl, where food is predigested. Hunters centuries ago noticed that some birds swallowed bits of stone that were too large to pass through the craw and into the digestive tract. These stones, unlike the sand and pebbles needed by birds to help grind food in the pouch, literally stuck in the craw, couldn't go down any farther. This oddity became part of the language of hunters and the phrase was soon used figuratively." From the Encyclopedia of Word and Phrase Origins by Robert Hendrickson (Facts on File, New York, 1997).

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#47
Quote: I'm really thinking the Great Depression of the 1930s was a manufactured event to move people from the farm to the factory. It did culminate in 1941 with mass enlistments of men, and women picking up the slack in the huge workforce needed for the war effort - which begs the question: what are they planning next?

Why to "Build Back Better," of course!
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