Healthy tradition= communal experience
#1
Don't kill the messenger. Fr Richard Rohr's a figure likely to have very few FE readers. However, my Episcopalian friend and I found we could find enriched, common ground in talking about him vis-a-vis the Church's predicament today, so I regard that as a plus. His thoughts on communal liturgy merit sharing. (If I had changed the author, I bet you'd "like"...)

To live with healthy Tradition is not an individual experience—it is a communal one. Perhaps this is why Catholicism emphasizes liturgy so much. It is the one thing that pulls us into a communal space where we can ask different questions, look at reality from a different perspective, and be told different truths, beyond the small truths of the private “I.” The endless telling of “this is me” stories eventually becomes self-validating, self-imprisoning, and, frankly, boring. Personal anecdotes become too small and aimless, unless they are a part of some larger life narratives. That is the genius of family stories, mythologies, and the biblical mind.

—from The Wisdom Pattern: Order, Disorder, Reorder
by Richard Rohr, OFM
The deeds you do may be the only sermon some people may hear today (Francis of Assisi); Win an argument, lose a soul (Fulton Sheen)
[-] The following 2 users Like Fionnchu's post:
  • Augustinian, Fortunabeargirl
Reply
#2
He speaks the truth. The entire purpose of the liturgy is to transport us to the eternal moment of Our Lord's Passion, which involves forgetting ourselves and focusing as a whole on that moment. Unfortunately, the New Mass does not do this and rather likes to keep us "grounded" in the present and focused on the "community" as its own "self."
"The Heart of Jesus is closer to you when you suffer, than when you are full of joy." - St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

Put not your trust in princes: In the children of men, in whom there is no salvation. - Ps. 145:2-3

"For there shall be a time, when they will not endure sound doctrine; but, according to their own desires, they will heap to themselves teachers, having itching ears: And will indeed turn away their hearing from the truth, but will be turned unto fables." - 2 Timothy 4:3-4
[-] The following 2 users Like Augustinian's post:
  • Fionnchu, jovan66102
Reply
#3
(01-27-2021, 10:39 PM)Fionnchu Wrote: Don't kill the messenger. Fr Richard Rohr's a figure likely to have very few FE readers. However, my Episcopalian friend and I found we could find enriched, common ground in talking about him vis-a-vis the Church's predicament today, so I regard that as a plus. His thoughts on communal liturgy merit sharing. (If I had changed the author, I bet you'd "like"...)

To live with healthy Tradition is not an individual experience—it is a communal one. Perhaps this is why Catholicism emphasizes liturgy so much. It is the one thing that pulls us into a communal space where we can ask different questions, look at reality from a different perspective, and be told different truths, beyond the small truths of the private “I.” The endless telling of “this is me” stories eventually becomes self-validating, self-imprisoning, and, frankly, boring. Personal anecdotes become too small and aimless, unless they are a part of some larger life narratives. That is the genius of family stories, mythologies, and the biblical mind.

—from The Wisdom Pattern: Order, Disorder, Reorder
by Richard Rohr, OFM
Please understand I'm not trying to be reactionary.  I would say this if it was written by Pope St. Plus X himself:

You need both to correct the other.  On top of that the line where one begins and the other ends may not exist.

Selfish narratives themselves exist as a part and in reaction to communal narratives.  This is the modern western world view, and it is reinforced with our books, movies, cultural heroes, and upbringing.  Even if a person doesn't think they follow a larger narrative they do by default, and those personal anecdotes are shaped and given their meaning by that larger narrative.

Sorry if I'm projecting a meaning in Rohr's quote that isn’t there.  I'm not familiar with his work and it is quote after all.
[-] The following 1 user Likes MacPasquale's post:
  • Fionnchu
Reply
#4
(01-28-2021, 12:10 AM)Augustinian Wrote: The entire purpose of the liturgy is to transport us to the eternal moment of Our Lord's Passion, which involves forgetting ourselves and focusing as a whole on that moment. 

I believe it was either the Venerable Fulton Sheen or Henri Daniel-Rops who said that at the Words of Institution, time and space are ripped away and we stand on the Hill of Calvary. He was writing of the Old Mass, of course, in a coffee table book of the Mass.

***ETA*** I got curious and did some research. It was actually Daniel-Rops in a book from 1958 called This Is The Mass: as described by Henri Daniel-Rops, as celebrated by Fulton J. Sheen, which explains why I was confused.
Jovan-Marya of the Immaculate Conception Weismiller, T.O.Carm.

Vive le Christ-roi! Vive le roi, Louis XX!
Deum timete, regem honorificate.
Kansan by birth! Albertan by choice! Jayhawk by the Grace of God!
“Qui me amat, amet et canem meum. (Who loves me will love my dog.)” 
St Bernard of Clairvaux

My Blog 'Musings of an Old Curmudgeon'
FishEaters Group on MeWe
[-] The following 2 users Like jovan66102's post:
  • Augustinian, Fionnchu
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)