Reading For Lent
#11
The story of Our Lady of Lourdes is wonderful reading anytime of year, but interestingly 14 of the 18 visions of the Blessed Mother seen by St Bernadette came during Lent. Also the Lenten Dates in 1858 were the same as 2021.
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#12
I started reading "The Day Christ Died" by Jim Bishop. It was recommended to me by a friend.
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#13
Another almost forgotten anecdote about St Bernadette that really captures her wonderful humility. After the visions at the grotto, picture cards of her began to circulate, and people would occasionally ask Bernadette to autograph them, and she actually would, writing "Priez Pour Bernadette" on them. Pray For Bernadette.
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#14
I have been reading Blessed Anne Catherine Emmerich’s “The Passion Dolorosa” every night. 

https://www.jesus-passion.com/DOLOROUS_P...CHRIST.htm
“Take my advice and live for a long, long time. Because the maddest thing a man can do in this life is to let himself die.” 

“When life itself seems lunatic, who knows where madness lies? Perhaps to be too practical is madness. To surrender dreams — this may be madness. Too much sanity may be madness — and maddest of all: to see life as it is, and not as it should be!” 

- Don Quixote
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#15
Meditations for Lent by Bishop Jacques Benigne Bossuet. This is a French classic, translated into English.
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#16
Finished Trochu's book on Bernadette, it was wonderful. So many great stories. In her last years on earth, I like when Bernadette worried that people wouldn't pray for after she died, because they thought she was so saintly. Then she added how she get stuck in purgatory because of it. Now I've started a rather short book on St Pius X.
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#17
Enjoying Tito Colliander's Way of the Ascetics.

Chapter 11: "Always keep this in mind: you are not doing anything virtuous by your continence. Or can it be considered a virtuous act when a man who, out of his own carelessness, has been trapped deep down in a mine shaft, takes pick and shovel and tries to work his way out? Is it not, on the contrary, quite natural for him to make use of the tools given him by a higher authority to make his way up out of the choking air and darkness? ... The tools are the implements of salvation, the commands of the Gospel and the holy Sacraments...."

"Continence" is used generally for refraining from a variety of goods.
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#18
Forbes short bio of St Pius X is so inspiring to read. Such a brilliant holy successor to St Peter, Giuseppe Sarto was. Just read this today. ""God is driven out of politics by this theory of the separation of church and state," wrote the new patriarch in his first letter to his flock. He is driven out of learning by systematized doubt; from art by the degrading influence of realism; from law by a morality which is guided by the senses alone; from the schools by the abolition of religious instruction; from Christian marriage, which they want to deprive of the grace of the sacrament; from the cottage of the poor peasant, who disdains the help of Him who alone can make his hard life bearable; from the palaces of the rich, who no longer fear the eternal Judge who will one day ask from them an account of their stewardship. ...We must fight this great contemporary error, the enthronement of man in the place of God. The solution of this, as of all other problems, lies in the Church and the teaching of the Gospel."

                                         Truly one of the greatest Popes ever !
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