Where did the idea come from; to paint the Father in Catholicism?
#1
Question 
When it comes to Catholicism; we have paintings of Jesus etc, and that’s okay. But when it comes to Judaism in Exodus 20:4 Adonai his Father said ‘Thou shalt not make to thyself a graven thing, nor the likeness of any thing that is in heaven above’

Than it got me thinking about Jesus’ sayings like ‘I and the Father are one’ & 
‘He who sees me, sees the Father’ or ‘I am the Alpha and the Omega’ 

...so in some ways We all can agree ‘Like Father Like Son‘, than it makes me wonder would even Jesus himself want us to be painting himself or Especially his Father? 

If as Catholics we respect the Jewish tradition to keep the Tetragrammaton hidden than why aren’t we also respecting not to be painting The Father?

Thank you.
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#2
In Orthodoxy, it is forbidden to depict God the Father.
The Gospel is traditional.
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#3
(02-22-2021, 11:05 PM)Machabeus Wrote: If as Catholics we respect the Jewish tradition to keep the Tetragrammaton hidden than why aren’t we also respecting not to be painting The Father?

Well, for one, we don't keep the name of God hidden ... so, there's that.
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#4
(02-22-2021, 11:35 PM)Evangelium Wrote: In Orthodoxy, it is forbidden to depict God the Father.

Why should we take our cues from what schismatics do?
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#5
(02-22-2021, 11:54 PM)MagisterMusicae Wrote:
(02-22-2021, 11:35 PM)Evangelium Wrote: In Orthodoxy, it is forbidden to depict God the Father.

Why should we take our cues from what schismatics do?
Another point is that he technically IS depicted but in such a way that emphasizes his transcendence. You might have seen an icon of, for instance, the Transfiguration? Jesus stands in front of an almond-shaped object with a diamond over it. That's the Father and the Holy Spirit.
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#6
Tetragrammaton. I had to look up that fancy word. Seeing Our Heavenly Father as an old man with a long beard makes him more accessible, don't you think? I like that.

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#7
(02-22-2021, 11:05 PM)Machabeus Wrote: But when it comes to Judaism in Exodus 20:4 Adonai his Father said ‘Thou shalt not make to thyself a graven thing, nor the likeness of any thing that is in heaven above’

If you take this line of reasoning to its logical end, then crucifixes are prohibited.
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#8
(02-22-2021, 11:35 PM)Evangelium Wrote: In Orthodoxy, it is forbidden to depict God the Father.

Nah it actually happens all the time... even on Athos :o
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#9
I understand why Jews and some Christians prohibit it. It has a tendency to promote an anthropomorphic view of God, which can be problematic. Should we view God the Father as a magical superhuman bearded man in the clouds? I don't think so.

However, as JacafamalaRedux points out, it makes God more accessible. A simple conception of God that most people can relate to, even if it is imperfect. It's the Sunday school conception of God that some Catholics stick with all of their lives, which I suppose is better than not believing at all. Maybe.

Then again, who isn't moved by beautiful Catholic art? I know the paintings of God the Father, the Holy Spirit, and angels aren't literal depictions, but they're inspiring nonetheless.
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#10
(02-22-2021, 11:05 PM)Machabeus Wrote: When it comes to Catholicism; we have paintings of Jesus etc, and that’s okay. But when it comes to Judaism in Exodus 20:4 Adonai his Father said ‘Thou shalt not make to thyself a graven thing, nor the likeness of any thing that is in heaven above’

Than it got me thinking about Jesus’ sayings like ‘I and the Father are one’ & 
‘He who sees me, sees the Father’ or ‘I am the Alpha and the Omega’ 

...so in some ways We all can agree ‘Like Father Like Son‘, than it makes me wonder would even Jesus himself want us to be painting himself or Especially his Father? 

If as Catholics we respect the Jewish tradition to keep the Tetragrammaton hidden than why aren’t we also respecting not to be painting The Father?

Thank you.

One thing that is different is that God had not revealed Himself yet to the Jews when that tradition was made. There was no likeness of God that the Jews had as a reference, only the likeness of the gods around them. Once God came to earth in the incarnation, then we had a physical, real, image of God that we could see, touch and feel. After that, we imitated what God did, namely, we imitated the physical nature that God revealed to us in our artwork as a glory to Him for what He revealed to us.
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