Impurity within Marriage
#21
(03-03-2021, 11:43 AM)Adventus Wrote: God's permissive will isn't that they just hang around......but rather, that they are free to influence.

I wasn't speaking of a physical location, of course, but obsession.

God's permissive will limits the devils to certain actions. They are not "free to influence" but only permitted to the point allowed by God (and which therefore His grace and the strength of the soul attacked have the capacity to resist, provided they cooperate with that grace)

(03-03-2021, 11:43 AM)Adventus Wrote: Fr. Ripperger also clearly makes distinctions between a person struggling with something, for other psychological reasons, and generational spirits.

Yes he does. The struggles are well supported by Ascetic authors. "Generational spirits" are found no where in said authors.

(03-03-2021, 11:43 AM)Adventus Wrote: In addition, he speaks of it skipping generations as well.

And?

(03-03-2021, 11:43 AM)Adventus Wrote: Lastly, isn't the exorcism at baptism to protect and cast out?  

Cast out what?

That certainly leaves room for the possibility that Fr. R speaks of.

Not really, since it just prompts the same question. Lay people praying "deliverance prayers" then are more effective than the power of Orders through Exorcism. Baptismal exorcisms do not then actually cast out whatever "spirit" was there, and we need to later, rely on "deliverance prayers".

(03-03-2021, 11:43 AM)Adventus Wrote: I think what you did in trying to approach him was a good thing, but there are more variables to this to be so dismissive about it. It doesn't have to make what we have available to us relatively impotent. Especially when bringing sin and God's permissive will into the equation. There doesn't need to be a contradiction.

Hopefully Fr. Ripperger can come out with a detailed response on this.

I really wish he would put out a solid theological treatise on the claim of "generation spirits". I have found this idea nowhere but in Protestant circles and then a post-Vatican II fascination in third-world countries often infested with superstitious practices. For instance a priest I know well who was assigned to work in the Philippines said many people there ask about "generation healing" and "generation spirits" convinced that all of their failings are due not to their own faults and malice, but to demons attacking them.

If it could be well established and discovered in traditional Catholic theology, I would be very interested to read this, and would be willing to, if it makes sense, to stand corrected. Until then, I remain highly skeptical

When one reads, for instance in Tanqueray, "we must follow the rule of accepting as diabolical only such phenomena as point, because of their extraordinary nature or because of the sum-total of circumstances, to the action of the Evil One," who had just finished pointing out the error on the extreme of attributing all evil to the devil, forgetting that Original Sin and morbid states explains much, and zero mention of "generational spirits" it worries me.
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#22
I have the "Deliverance Prayers for the Laity" book by Fr. Ripperger. I highly recommend it. It's excellent. Some are standard prayers, some are lesser known. I like the Litany to the Precious Blood among them. We are all called to spiritual battle in some way. Just as we all have Guardians Angels appointed to guard us by the loving Providence of God, so also, we have some demons particularly focused on tempting us. We must fight against them by prayers, Sacraments and sacramentals, in order to win a crown from God in Heaven. Thank God we have plenty of resources to do so.
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"My dear Jesus, before the Holy Trinity, Our Heavenly Mother, and the whole Heavenly Court, united with Your Most Precious Blood and Your Sacrifice on Calvary, I hereby offer my whole life to the Intention of Your Sacred Heart and to the Immaculate Heart of Mary.  Together with my life, I place at Your disposal all Holy Masses, all my Holy Communions, all my good deeds, all my sacrifices ... https://marianapostolate.com/life-offering/
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#23
I like this presentation but you may have your own favorite source of fervorinos.

Also I like to remember the idea that our chances are not infinite. And I pray to see the way the saints saw. See with their vision.

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#24
Another Great Devotion to obtain the Grace never to commit mortal sin again, especially since it's Lent now, is the Way of the Cross.

The Saints and spiritual writers say meditating on the Passion of Jesus is one of the quickest ways to make spiritual progress and hate sin.

St. Bonaventure tells us this, as related by St. Alphonsus: “He who desires to go on advancing from virtue to virtue, from grace to grace, should meditate continually on the Passion of Jesus.” And he adds that “there is no practice more profitable for the entire sanctification of the soul than the frequent meditation of the sufferings of Jesus Christ.” St. Augustine also said a single tear shed at the remembrance of the Passion of Jesus is worth more than a pilgrimage to Jerusalem, or a year of fasting on bread and water.

St. Paul of the Cross states, “”The remembrance of the most holy Passion of Jesus Christ is the door through which the soul enters into intimate union with God, interior recollection and most sublime contemplation.”

St. Alphonsus in particular has beautiful stations of the Cross, where we expressly ask, through His Falls, never to fall into grave sin again.

Some particular promises for Way of the Cross relevant here: "1. I promise eternal life to those who pray, from time to time, the Way of the Cross...6. I will grant them the remission of all their sins, even if they be as scarlet; if they be more than the grains of sand on the seashore and the stars in the heavens, all of them will be erased by the Way of the Cross ... 9. I will bless them at each Way of the Cross and my blessing will follow them everywhere on earth, and after their death, in Heaven for all eternity... 11. I will give them the grace never again to commit a mortal sin for I will give them the grace never again to separate themselves from Me." https://stationsofthecross1.weebly.com/p...cross.html

St. Alphonsus' Stations of the Cross where we ask this particular Grace: "First Station: My adorable Jesus, it was not Pilate, no, it was my sins that condemned Thee to die. I beseech Thee, by the merits of this sorrowful journey, to assist my soul in its journey towards eternity. I love Thee, my beloved Jesus; I repent with my whole heart for having offended Thee. Never permit me to separate myself from Thee again. Grant that I may love Thee always; and then do with me what Thou wilt. Third Station: My beloved Jesus, it is not the weight of the Cross, but my sins, which have made Thee suffer so much pain. Ah, by the merits of this first fall, deliver me from the misfortune of falling into mortal sin. I love Thee, O my Jesus, with my whole heart; I repent of having offended Thee. Never permit me to separate myself from Thee again. Grant that I may love Thee always; and then do with me what Thou wilt." From: https://www.ecatholic2000.com/liguori/st...ross.shtml

"Seventh Station: My most gentle Jesus, how many times Thou hast pardoned me, and how many times have I fallen again, and begun again to offend Thee! Oh, by the merits of this new fall, give me the necessary help to persevere in Thy grace until death. Grant that in all temptations which assail me I may always commend myself to Thee. I love Thee, Jesus my love; I repent of having offended Thee. Never permit me to offend Thee again. Grant that I may love Thee always; and then do with me what Thou wilt." Ninth Station: "Ah, my outraged Jesus, by the merits of the weakness Thou didst suffer in going to Calvary, give me strength sufficient to conquer all human respect, and all my wicked passions, which have led me to despise Thy friendship. I love Thee, Jesus my love, with my whole heart; I repent of having offended Thee. Never permit me to offend Thee again. Grant that I may love Thee always; and then do with me what Thou wilt." and many other places. St. Alphonsus' Stations of the Cross are just a wonderful devotion for obtaining this Grace.

If we ask, we will surely receive, provided we ask and go on asking, in faith and in perseverance. We can do all things through Him Who strengthens us.

May Our Lord bless us all and make us all Saints, giving us the Grace, during this Lenten Season, through His Passion, never to sin gravely again. Amen.
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#25
(02-27-2021, 03:42 PM)SacraCor714 Wrote: Most of you old-timers on the forum know this, but I've struggled with masturbation since childhood (I am female) and it has only continued within my marriage of almost two years with two kids. I have been very open and honest with my husband about this and he has been nothing short of loving and understanding, but I still hate myself and feel like he deserves so much better. I feel like every time I commit this sin, I am cheating on him.

My husband is a very pure man and I trust him completely, even though he works at a place where he is surrounded by pornography (his boss has porn hung up on the shop walls and magazines lying around everywhere). Our sex life is excellent and he satisfies me completely, but I still have very strong urges to masturbate several times a week, especially at night when I am struggling to fall asleep. 

I have no hesitation in saying that I am addicted. I have been to four therapists and completed two online addiction recovery programs to no avail. Furthermore, my husband and I are looking at a long period of abstinence after #2 is born in July since we have decided we cannot afford to have any more children until he has gone to school and gotten a better job. I fear that I will struggle all the more with masturbating during this time even while my husband remains continent, which is as unfair as it is reprehensible. 

I once heard Fr. Ripperger say that children often inherit the sins of their parents. My father was a chronic masturbator. I am now afraid that my two sons will also inherit this disgusting sin from their mother, the very person who is supposed to protect them from evil and foster in them a strong devotion to purity. I am a horrible role model and a hypocrite to be sure. I am not fit to raise these boys well. 

Has anyone else here struggled with impurity within their marriage, and if so, what did you do about it?

I will pray for you, that you stay strong in your faith and desire to do what is right. I have a childhood friend who gave up on religion because of this., yet he doesn’t pray.
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#26
(03-02-2021, 06:01 PM)MagisterMusicae Wrote:
(03-02-2021, 10:59 AM)capmchuck Wrote: I actually really connect with Fr. Ripperger's talks regarding the demonic.  It sinks in with me because I am a Catholic convert from a "protestant" upbringing, even though church was the very last priority for my parents growing up.  With that said, ever since I joined the Catholic Church and developing an allegiance to traditional Catholic teaching, I can clearly see the origins of my struggles and am more aware of the diabolical tactics than ever before.  So before I disagree with someone who is deemed well versed in Catholic teachings, especially a Priest, I think it is imperative to examine who they are directing their opinions to, i.e. converts, reverts, protestants, people of other religions, atheists, etc.

It was one of Fr Ripperger's students, who is an FSSP priest who first made me worried about Fr Ripperger.

This priest told me that in De Angelis at the seminary in Denton, Fr Ripperger insisted on giving parts of the class about demons in Latin, and then forbidding the discussion of the materials even to other seminarians who were not in the class. The reason, Fr Ripperger said, is that unless one has the tools necessary to handle this knowledge about the devil and demons, such information risks diabolic influence.

In my own seminary formation before I left, we learned in English, and were not forbidden from discussion, but advised to avoid discussing this and also moral theology with others who were not so trained, because we might cause problems for them who have not the tools to understand. So, despite that it was a different professor and different seminary, the main advice was similar.

Fast-forward 15 years later, Fr Ripperger is doing the exact opposite of the advice he gave to his seminarians (which is why, said this FSSP priest, the FSSP superiors asked their priests not to promote Fr Ripperger's works and talks).

Normally, as you say, I would not call out someone who was more of an expert than myself, but when there are solid reasons to throw up red flags, I think it prudent to do so.

Thank you, Magistri Mihi, for raising this important point. Many of my friends are frequent subscribers to Fr. Ripperger's teachings and, to a lesser extent, I have been too. As many have pointed out in this thread, what the good Father says is certainly plausible and, given the shiny veneer of tradition (which is partly his own fault and partly the fault of those who post his sermons online with the accompanying "trad warrior" aesthetic), reaches into the realm of prima facie truth. To have, at my disposal, this significant aspersion on the veracity of the claims is important, not to discredit the good father, but to raise the need to examine his teachings more closely. This, I think, is the key: to neither dismiss nor accept the claims that are made as true, but to examine them in light of established tradition and doctrine and come to a more complete conclusion.
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