Single life in the world
#1
Are you called to single life in the world?  How did you come to embrace this vocation?  How do you see it?  How do you live it out?
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#2
Shhhhh! Don't say that too loud!  There are people who say such a thing doesn't exist...
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#3
This is a delightful book on the subject, which unfortunately I gave away so I can't give specifics.

The Mystery of Love for the Single by Rev. Fr. Dominic J. Unger
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#4
Admittedly I'm kinda hoping that single life isn't my calling. I need a proper family in my life, and aside from my brothers and parents there aren't many I'm close to. Making my own seems to be the only thing worth aspiring to at this point, most of my more worldly aspirations washed up when I found out how messed up our country's space program is.

If I hit 30 without any real love in my life, well maybe it's time to start considering some sort of religious vocation.
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#5
(03-16-2021, 09:29 PM)Pandora Wrote: Shhhhh! Don't say that too loud!  There are people who say such a thing doesn't exist...

I'm one of those, but not in the same way most think.

I also do not think one can say, properly speaking, there is a "vocation" to anything but the religious state or priesthood.

This is because I see all of these things as prudent human choices based on the circumstances of one's life. The Will of God is detected through these circumstances and cooperation with the graces that God sends, but ultimately, these are prudent choices about how one thinks they will best save their soul.

If one desires to raise a family, he marries. If he does not want to raise a family, he does not marry. In both cases, such a one is bound to remain chaste according to his state in life.

If an unmarried man wants to become a priest, he sets his house in order, then goes to the seminary. Here this human decision is not enough, though, and the call of God through the call of the Bishop is the final element which makes a man a priest. That is, properly speaking, a vocation.

If an unmarried man wants to be a monk or religious brother, he disposes himself and then enters the monastery or novitiate. Similarly if a woman wants to be a religious, she does the same and then presents herself to the convent. Again, this is not enough, and it is the approval of the superiors (who act with jurisdiction given by the Church), who "call" the sister or brother to make vows. Again, in this we see a "call" by the authority established by Christ.

In the case of marriage or remaining an unmarried lay man or woman, there is no authority acting for God which confirms this decision. Even the ceremonies are not the Church calling someone, and so there is no "vocation" here, strictly.

Marriage and remaining unmarried are "vocations" only in the same loose sense that plumbing, architecture, or zymurgy (a very noble "calling") are vocations in which one decides to pursue a career.

Having said that, there is nothing wrong with wanting to remain single and not pursue a religious or ecclesiastical vocation. One can save their soul, and perhaps better this way, and in a loose sense this could be a "vocation", but it should not be looked at on the same plane as a religious or ecclesiastical vocation, which is a vocation, strictly.
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#6
(03-17-2021, 03:10 AM)MagisterMusicae Wrote: zymurgy (a very noble "calling") 

I'm sure St Amand and St Arnold of Soissons would agree!
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#7
(03-17-2021, 03:25 AM)jovan66102 Wrote:
(03-17-2021, 03:10 AM)MagisterMusicae Wrote: zymurgy (a very noble "calling") 

I'm sure St Amand and St Arnold of Soissons would agree!

I had to look this one up.  I was imagining a Zydeco mass....just the thought makes actual zymurgy necessary and a blessing!
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#8
Thanks for that MM. The idea that everybody has an individual, special call from God to some particular way of life like a religious or priest has a call has caused untold amounts of pointless stress and anxiety in the lives of young Catholics.
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#9
(03-17-2021, 09:09 AM)Florus Wrote: Thanks for that MM. The idea that everybody has an individual, special call from God to some particular way of life like a religious or priest has a call has caused untold amounts of pointless stress and anxiety in the lives of young Catholics.

I agree.  For most of us, our only calling is to get to Heaven.  God didn't make most of us special, and the only harm in that is to our egos.
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#10
(03-17-2021, 03:10 AM)MagisterMusicae Wrote:
(03-16-2021, 09:29 PM)Pandora Wrote: Shhhhh! Don't say that too loud!  There are people who say such a thing doesn't exist...

I'm one of those, but not in the same way most think.

I also do not think one can say, properly speaking, there is a "vocation" to anything but the religious state or priesthood.

This is because I see all of these things as prudent human choices based on the circumstances of one's life. The Will of God is detected through these circumstances and cooperation with the graces that God sends, but ultimately, these are prudent choices about how one thinks they will best save their soul.

If one desires to raise a family, he marries. If he does not want to raise a family, he does not marry. In both cases, such a one is bound to remain chaste according to his state in life.

If an unmarried man wants to become a priest, he sets his house in order, then goes to the seminary. Here this human decision is not enough, though, and the call of God through the call of the Bishop is the final element which makes a man a priest. That is, properly speaking, a vocation.

If an unmarried man wants to be a monk or religious brother, he disposes himself and then enters the monastery or novitiate. Similarly if a woman wants to be a religious, she does the same and then presents herself to the convent. Again, this is not enough, and it is the approval of the superiors (who act with jurisdiction given by the Church), who "call" the sister or brother to make vows. Again, in this we see a "call" by the authority established by Christ.

In the case of marriage or remaining an unmarried lay man or woman, there is no authority acting for God which confirms this decision. Even the ceremonies are not the Church calling someone, and so there is no "vocation" here, strictly.

Marriage and remaining unmarried are "vocations" only in the same loose sense that plumbing, architecture, or zymurgy (a very noble "calling") are vocations in which one decides to pursue a career.

Having said that, there is nothing wrong with wanting to remain single and not pursue a religious or ecclesiastical vocation. One can save their soul, and perhaps better this way, and in a loose sense this could be a "vocation", but it should not be looked at on the same plane as a religious or ecclesiastical vocation, which is a vocation, strictly.

I completely agree.  My half joking/half serious point is that there are some in the trad community who don’t leave room for chaste, single, lay people in the world who simply are not married for whatever reason and also aren’t called to religious life.  The choices aren’t simply married or monastery, though I think just about everyone would agree those are the best and most natural states.
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