who can wear white veils?
#1
Someone asked me this question and I'm wondering if my answer was correct... the question was whether only a virgin could wear a white veil for Mass. 

My understanding was that the custom of wearing a white veil is cultural rather than theological. I read that it simply refers to a woman being married or unmarried, not whether or not she is a virgin.

I also thought of how people talk about only a virgin wearing a white wedding dress, but the idea of white wedding dresses were actually popularized by Queen Victoria and had nothing to do with virginity - white started to be used as a symbol of wealth, because it was an expensive fabric and stained easily (so it was for ladies who didn't do any manual labour etc). The idea of wearing a dress only once for a wedding was not the custom at the time. Wealthy ladies began wearing white wedding dresses because of Queen Victoria, and later it became a fashion for all classes. 

Does anyone know about veils? thank you!
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#2
Traditionally,girls wore chapel veils they were white. My mom had a black Mantilla. I don't know when in the USA, Mantillas became the norm and chapel veils went away and then there were more colors for Mantillas.
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#3
Do you happen to know if this is related to virginity, or just to the fact that someone is not married?

I'm thinking of how Consecrated Virgins traditionally have worn dark veils at their Consecration and afterwards - it's only recently that they began to wear white veils for the Consecration. (I also saw a photograph of a consecrated virgin in her everyday life wearing a dark veil for Mass). 

Also, nuns - who may or may not be virgins - wear white and then black veils. Consecrated Virgins of the early Church would wear veils to represent that they are not available to marriage. 

So it would seem that veil colour relates not to virginity, (since Consecrated Virgins wore dark veils), but to one's marital status? Since those who are either consecrated virgins or have perpetual vows of chastity (and these may be also virgins, or not), seem to often wear dark veils - just like married women do).

Any thoughts?
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#4
(04-02-2021, 02:26 PM)adoro.te.devote Wrote: Do you happen to know if this is related to virginity, or just to the fact that someone is not married?

Pretty sure it's just whether you're married.  It's not the Catholic version of a Scarlet A.
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#5
Thanks! I even know married women who wear white veils sometimes, like on certain feast days. And a sweet grandmother at our parish who wears white veils. It seems more of a cultural tradition.. that's what I told the person who asked me this question, but I just wanted to check my understanding :)
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#6
How sweet! I have my first Holy Communion missal from 70s.
It has photos and every girl not partaking had a white chapel veil. The moms had black.

I just ordered a gold Mantilla as it matches my hair . That and another color.
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#7
(04-02-2021, 05:17 PM)AnaCarolina1 Wrote: How sweet! I have my first Holy Communion missal from 70s.
It has photos and every girl not partaking had a white chapel veil. The moms had black.

I just ordered a gold Mantilla as it matches my hair . That and another color.

I like coloured veils too! I like blue ones in honour of Our Blessed Mother :)
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#8
I agree, it now just seems to be cultural.  I often thought it was for women who lived a chaste/virginal life, i.e. unmarried virgins and widows, but women tend to wear whatever colors they please regardless of age or state in the world.  I've seen some quite atrocious colored veils, but that's a story for another day.

I tend to wear a white veil most of the time, and a gray veil for Lent.  I may or may not start wearing it for Advent as well.  Today, for the first time ever, I wore a black veil.  I figured I was going to the Lord's funeral, so it seemed appropriate.
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#9
(04-02-2021, 02:26 PM)adoro.te.devote Wrote: Do you happen to know if this is related to virginity, or just to the fact that someone is not married?

I'm thinking of how Consecrated Virgins traditionally have worn dark veils at their Consecration and afterwards - it's only recently that they began to wear white veils for the Consecration. (I also saw a photograph of a consecrated virgin in her everyday life wearing a dark veil for Mass). 

Also, nuns - who may or may not be virgins - wear white and then black veils. Consecrated Virgins of the early Church would wear veils to represent that they are not available to marriage. 

So it would seem that veil colour relates not to virginity, (since Consecrated Virgins wore dark veils), but to one's marital status? Since those who are either consecrated virgins or have perpetual vows of chastity (and these may be also virgins, or not), seem to often wear dark veils - just like married women do).

Any thoughts?

Anyone but boys and men can wear white veils in church. ;-D
Oh my Jesus, I surrender myself to you. Take care of everything.--Fr Dolindo Ruotolo

Persevere..Eucharist, Holy Rosary, Brown Scapular, Confession. You will win.
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#10
I follow Traditional blogs. It is no longer necessary to wear black veils. Young ladies like to match thier outfits. I do too. So I will order more.
In spring colors that match my dress. Such a lovely time of year to celebrate new birth of Christ .
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