Internet Filters???
#21
(04-25-2021, 10:24 AM)joegrane Wrote: Are you sure OpenDNS is still working for adult content filtering?

I haven't tested it, but I think it's working. Some of the Youtube competitors (like Rumble or Bitchute but smaller) get blocked, apparently, because they don't do a good enough job of policing their platforms.

(04-25-2021, 10:24 AM)joegrane Wrote: I don't know if there is a DNS filtering service that also filters VPNs.

I doubt any of them do; and even if they did, it'd be trivial to defeat them.

(04-25-2021, 10:24 AM)joegrane Wrote: We'll want our recommendations to be as simple as possible for average folks.  

I assume a person could add custom restrictions in their filtering software--Covenant Eyes, Qustodio, etc--to restrict access to VPNs.  

Kids should be logged onto the computer without administrative permissions so they can't modify network settings, including setting up a VPN connection.  

Are there any reasonably priced routers that could be purchased that provide adult content filtering.  They would likely be customizable, allowing for VPN restrictions?   We could then provide tips for setting up the routers.

I think the solution is going to be multi-layered, with at least:

1. DNS blocking
2. Some kind of filtering in hardware - https://www.lifewire.com/best-parental-c...rs-4160776
3. Some kind of client-based protection, like Covenant Eyes or Qustodio
4. Most important - direct parental supervision

And frankly, the DNS blocking is going to be the most difficult to implement and the least beneficial, so I think this list should be considered in reverse priority order.
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#22
(04-13-2021, 12:32 PM)Fontevrault Wrote: Well, we have hit that age and discovered that my eldest son has borrowed his grandfather's computer and password.  He looked up some stuff on YouTube that is pretty gross.  I have no idea how he got the idea to do so.  He doesn't have regular access to a computer.  We have none of that filth in the house.  I'm upset, but he did it and then went to confession and discussed it with the priest - so that's good.  He knows it's wrong and has apologized - that's good too.  We've changed the passwords on all devices as a general precaution but I also would like to get a filter on the internet ASAP.  Does anyone have any recommendations?
I know I’m late but if you want a free yet fantastic filter, I highly suggest Cold Turkey. You can ban whichever “search” and whichever “website” you want. He’ll have to be looking for a long time before he can find anything of use and you can continue adding banned words and websites to the list. And it’s all free and impossible to be removed from the computer for as long as you want, as it’s not password controlled. You just pick a date on which the filter gets removed and it is impossible for him to take it away until that date. If he tries deleting the app, the filter shuts down the entire computer (intense, I know lol). Hope this helps!
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#23
(04-25-2021, 10:24 AM)joegrane Wrote:
(04-23-2021, 08:50 PM)ChairmanJoeAintMyPresident Wrote: Here at home, I have Pi-hole running in a VM on a blade server.  .... it's pointed at the OpenDNS Family-Safe servers for the requests that it has to forward. ....
Are you sure OpenDNS is still working for adult content filtering?   The adult filtering used to be prominently advertised on their site but since Cisco took over that aspect has been buried. 
I tested OpenDNS using the addresses I had in my old notes.  It worked against porn.com so apparently the service is still up. 

Quote:Open DNS  now cisco
https://www.opendns.com/home-internet-security/
Our FamilyShield nameservers are:
208.67.222.123    208.67.220.123

I like DNS filtering as one layer of a home or small office Internet content filtering plan.  It is free and provides some protection for a tablet or laptop brought into the house by a guest.    Of course it does not protect a smart phone's internet connection via cell phone towers.  

The down side of this is that you have to reconfigure your router.   You could also modify the settings of a desktop computer with a static  DNS Server addresses above.  You'd have to do that from your administrator account and then have kids log on to a non-administrator account. 

If someone wants to use DNS filtering but is struggling to implement it, let us know.  Maybe we can give you the needed instructions for your router.
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#24
(04-25-2021, 05:28 PM)ChairmanJoeAintMyPresident Wrote: I think the solution is going to be multi-layered, with at least:

1. DNS blocking
2. Some kind of filtering in hardware - https://www.lifewire.com/best-parental-c...rs-4160776
3. Some kind of client-based protection, like Covenant Eyes or Qustodio
4. Most important - direct parental supervision
...

Thanks for the link to the lifewire.com article on parental control features of home routers.   Unfortunately purchasing a new router is more expensive than one of the options in the article, a Circle Home Plus device

Circle Home Plus (CPS) is a device that gets connected to your existing home router.  CPS handles the parental control features then sends the internet traffic to your home router.   This reduces cost somewhat but there is certainly still more complexity than installing an app on your computer.   It is also much more powerful than just installing an app on your computer.  

CPS review
https://www.lifewire.com/circle-home-plu...ew-5121158

"Without the subscription, you only have access to filters, usage, and history. The premium subscription adds in extras like location, bed time, off time, pause, rewards, and time limits..."
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