How do I enjoy learning the faith?
#1
Sad 
I have been struggling in being studious, in part because I do not find it exciting sadly. I have a special interest ( I am autistic) interest in military warfare, and I do not enjoy learning about the faith sadly. But I want to enjoy learning about the faith, but I do not. How do I enjoy learning about the faith? It is also very abstract. By that, I mean with military stuff, I can picture a trench or a fortification. I can't really do that with faith stuff. Too often it goes over my head, or it is not exciting, like gun fire is. I don't know.
I will try to read scripture, but often I spend more time day dreaming about militias and tactics. Maybe it is because I have been dying for some excitement in life, danger or something. Maybe I have become fond of war/nationalism and the like because it gave me a sense of purpose, but I am still restless and still hoping for something crazy to happen just so I will have something to do. I often daydream about going an an adventure and doing something exciting. Other times I dream of fighting in Donbass, and taking back eastern Ukraine. Life...is dull, I want to settle down, but I am restless and looking for a fight in a way. How do I desire to learn the faith, it is opposite of what I am used to; action, excitement, adventure. It is far more tamed and reserved than what I am used to.
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#2
Understanding the Catholic Faith from a military perspective probably isn't too difficult.  In fact, I've heard military metaphors used before, like the Church being a fortress and each Christian being a soldier inside the fortress, guarding against the attacks of the enemy.  Maybe learning about the Faith in terms like that, and realizing how a great spiritual war is currently going on, might help sustain your interest.

Consider this, as an example: Rules of Spiritual Combat.

You could also study parts of Scripture that involve martial aspects, like the conquest of Canaan or much of 1&2 Kings.  A very real war is going on between the Devil and his fallen angels, and those who have sided with God.
"For the true friends of the people are neither revolutionaries nor innovators, but traditionalists."
- Pope St. Pius X

"For there shall be a time, when they will not endure sound doctrine; but, according to their own desires, they will heap to themselves teachers, having itching ears: And will indeed turn away their hearing from the truth, but will be turned unto fables."
- 2 Timothy 4:3-4

"Therefore God shall send them the operation of error, to believe lying: That all may be judged who have not believed the truth, but have consented to iniquity."
- 2 Thessalonians 2:11-12
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#3
St. Ignatius' Two Standards is a military metaphor, as well. Just make sure you're reading a traditional source. I went looking for something that might be helpful, and many of the top results are fruity SJW nonsense (probably because of the state of today's Jesuit order.)

http://www.therealpresence.org/archives/...ty_003.htm

https://padreperegrino.org/2020/08/vlx18/

https://padreperegrino.org/2020/08/vlx19/
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#4
On the subject of Scripture study, much of the first dozen or so books of the Old Testament feature a lot of battles, wars, internal struggles and civil/religious strife, etc.  The story of the Exodus, for example, is the struggle to liberate the people (i.e. nation) of Israel from Egyptian oppression.  This is followed by the wandering in the wilderness (including some battles) and the struggle to found the nation in the land of Canaan (ancient nationalism, in a sense).  And so on.  The New Testament isn't without some martial imagery, such as the Apocalypse of St. John.
"For the true friends of the people are neither revolutionaries nor innovators, but traditionalists."
- Pope St. Pius X

"For there shall be a time, when they will not endure sound doctrine; but, according to their own desires, they will heap to themselves teachers, having itching ears: And will indeed turn away their hearing from the truth, but will be turned unto fables."
- 2 Timothy 4:3-4

"Therefore God shall send them the operation of error, to believe lying: That all may be judged who have not believed the truth, but have consented to iniquity."
- 2 Thessalonians 2:11-12
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#5
Read about the history of the militant orders, the battles of lepanto and sieges of vienna (the second one especially, go winged hussars!). Also, addint the siege of malta, massive fight. Use that as a means of looking into the faith of the knights of malta.

The militant orders, look into their founding, their battles, etc, then look into the latin mass. Study the faith these men had, the devotions they had, the reason they focused on different holy sites, and from there, study why. Why did they focus on different areas in Israel, why did they risk their lives and futures for different relics? They would have all been well studied on the importance of the faith and its history, to the point that it dictated alot of their actions, study those aspects to get a clearer understanding of both the faith and the military history.

Lepanto and vienna, a series of massive collisions between the Catholic faith and Islam. Study the importance of the rosary in both of these massive battles.
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#6
(04-14-2021, 11:05 AM)SeekerofChrist Wrote: On the subject of Scripture study, much of the first dozen or so books of the Old Testament feature a lot of battles, wars, internal struggles and civil/religious strife, etc.  The story of the Exodus, for example, is the struggle to liberate the people (i.e. nation) of Israel from Egyptian oppression.  This is followed by the wandering in the wilderness (including some battles) and the struggle to found the nation in the land of Canaan (ancient nationalism, in a sense).  And so on.  The New Testament isn't without some martial imagery, such as the Apocalypse of St. John.
I would also just quickly add that if you want the most intense back-to-back action book of the Old Testament, I think Judges is certainly where it’s at. It never stops, and the set pieces are described very vividly so you’ll be able to imagine them quite well.
“Take my advice and live for a long, long time. Because the maddest thing a man can do in this life is to let himself die.” 

“When life itself seems lunatic, who knows where madness lies? Perhaps to be too practical is madness. To surrender dreams — this may be madness. Too much sanity may be madness — and maddest of all: to see life as it is, and not as it should be!” 

- Don Quixote
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#7
Smile 
Thank you all very much this has been very enlightening in regards how to proceed in this. Thank you!
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#8
My favourite Scripture study, by far, is Bishop Knecht’s Commentary. I purchased the paperback copy a couple months ago or so, and it’s truly one amazing book.
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#9
(04-14-2021, 11:38 AM)FultonFan Wrote: My favourite Scripture study, by far, is Bishop Knecht’s Commentary. I purchased the paperback copy a couple months ago or so, and it’s truly one amazing book.

There's a free pdf online of Bishop Knecht's Commentary, if you don't mind the format: http://www.saintsbooks.net/books/Bishop%...ipture.pdf
"The Heart of Jesus is closer to you when you suffer, than when you are full of joy." - St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

Put not your trust in princes: In the children of men, in whom there is no salvation. - Ps. 145:2-3

"For there shall be a time, when they will not endure sound doctrine; but, according to their own desires, they will heap to themselves teachers, having itching ears: And will indeed turn away their hearing from the truth, but will be turned unto fables." - 2 Timothy 4:3-4
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#10
Biblical commentaries, including Knecht's, here: https://www.fisheaters.com/catholiclibrary.html
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