Johnny Cash lyrics
#1
Question 
On June 29, 2008, Cardinal Francis Arinze, Prefect of the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments, wrote to the presidents of all conferences of bishops, prohibiting use of the term Yahweh in the liturgy, particularly in hymns and Psalm translations.

Johnny Cash in a song called ‘I shall not be moved’ from his 2004 album ‘My Mother’s Hymn Book’ sings ‘Jehovah‘. 
I’m aware of all the reasons and the churches complimentary tradition with the Jewish faith not to use it, But it makes me wonder; Is listening to this song an actual defiance and a Sin? 

Glory hallelujah, I shall not be moved
Anchored in Jehovah, I shall not be moved 
Just like the tree that's planted by the waters
I shall not be moved’
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#2
(04-16-2021, 04:02 PM)Machabeus Wrote: On June 29, 2008, Cardinal Francis Arinze, Prefect of the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments, wrote to the presidents of all conferences of bishops, prohibiting use of the term Yahweh in the liturgy, particularly in hymns and Psalm translations.

Johnny Cash in a song called ‘I shall not be moved’ from his 2004 album ‘My Mother’s Hymn Book’ sings ‘Jehovah‘. I’m aware of all the reasons and the churches complimentary tradition with the Jews not to use it, makes me wonder Is listening to this song an actual defiance and a Sin? 

Glory hallelujah, I shall not be moved
Anchored in Jehovah, I shall not be moved 
Just like the tree that's planted by the waters
I shall not be moved’
Johnny Cash's lyrics are not in the liturgy (well, not yet, anyway :-) ), and they are not hymns or Psalm translations in the Catholic ecclesiastical meaning of those.  It's a song.  Just a song.  If you couldn't listen to that, by the same standard would you be prohibited from saying or even reading the words "Jehovah's Witnesses", or just the word "Jehovah" in any context at all?  I don't think so.
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#3
The Jerusalem Bible and the New Jerusalem Bible use the name Yahweh liberally.  I believe these translations are approved by the Church.
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#4
I read that Jehovah and Adonay(i) are two words for God that the Jews used rather than YHWH.
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#5
(04-16-2021, 04:35 PM)Zedta Wrote: I read that Jehovah and Adonay(i) are two words for God that the Jews used rather than YHWH.

Observant Jews do not use Jehovah because it is an attempt to pronounce YHWH. Since Hebrew has no vowels in the written language no one knows how it was actually pronounced. Jehovah is fairly recent, having been introduced by William Tyndale in his heretical Bible translation published in 1535 by Miles Coverdale.

Here's where it comes from. According to Jewish practices, YHWH should not be pronounced but read as "Adonai" (אֲדֹנָי‎/"my Lord"), or, if the previous or next word already was Adonai, as "Elohim" (אֱלֹהִים‎/"God"). Writing the vowel diacritics of these two words on the consonants YHWH produces יְהֹוָה‎ and יֱהֹוִה‎ respectively, non-words that would spell "Yehovah" and "Yehovih" respectively.
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#6
(04-16-2021, 04:13 PM)Evangelium Wrote: The Jerusalem Bible and the New Jerusalem Bible use the name Yahweh liberally.  I believe these translations are approved by the Church.

...according to google they are, I don’t own one so I don’t know if it actually contains an Imprimatur or not. But I like the way your thinking, like a lawyer lol!
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#7
(04-16-2021, 04:02 PM)Machabeus Wrote: On June 29, 2008, Cardinal Francis Arinze, Prefect of the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments, wrote to the presidents of all conferences of bishops, prohibiting use of the term Yahweh in the liturgy, particularly in hymns and Psalm translations.

Johnny Cash in a song called ‘I shall not be moved’ from his 2004 album ‘My Mother’s Hymn Book’ sings ‘Jehovah‘. I’m aware of all the reasons and the churches complimentary tradition with the Jews not to use it, makes me wonder Is listening to this song an actual defiance and a Sin? 

Glory hallelujah, I shall not be moved
Anchored in Jehovah, I shall not be moved 
Just like the tree that's planted by the waters
I shall not be moved’
1. The Congregation for Divine Worship is basically nothing more than a "suggestion committee" ever since it was renamed from the Holy Office.

2. Secular music is almost always theologically problematic to begin with and if listened to, should be done with severe discernment and awareness to the theological problems. There are some who would say that is a sin to even listen to it!

3. The Tetragrammaton has lost its pronunciation somewhere in history. We arrive at "Jehovah" or "Yehovah" because some Germans mistook the vowels added into the Masoretic text instructing the reading of "Adonai" as the actual vowels for the Tetragrammaton. That's why we typically see "the LORD" in some translations. But it is only blasphemy to take the LORD's name in vain. He knows who you're talking to even if you mispronounce it in your own private prayer.
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#8
(04-16-2021, 08:10 PM)newenglandsun Wrote: 1. The Congregation for Divine Worship is basically nothing more than a "suggestion committee" ever since it was renamed from the Holy Office.

The Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments does not and never has had anything to do with the Holy Office. It was originally called the Sacred Congregation for the Discipline of the Sacraments, and was renamed to its current name in 1969. The Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, originally called the Supreme Sacred Congregation of the Roman and Universal Inquisition, was renamed by St Pius X in 1908 to the Supreme Sacred Congregation of the Holy Office, taking its current name in 1965.
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Vive le Christ-roi! Vive le roi, Louis XX!
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