Becoming a homesteader
#1
I need help becoming an independent adult in these times. I have decided to become a homesteader, I am in a situation where doing that is difficult at the moment as I currently don’t own my own residence and would much prefer to have property that I own. But I’ll need a lot more money if I am going buy my own property; I also need to make connections with the local farming community in my area in order better develop the farming skills I need. (I am working on those by myself, but obviously, I could really use some in-person instruction and advice) Also a lot of other issues are interfering with my endeavour.

Please pray for me that I can get everything I need and become a homesteader and have an independent life. (I’d also really appreciate it if I could find my future wife in the process and have a family)
[Image: Blessed_Virgin_Mary_Holding_Jesus_with_S...abriel.jpg]
Glory to God
and
Hail Mary!
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#2
(04-21-2021, 02:48 PM)MaryLover Wrote: I need help becoming an independent adult in these times. I have decided to become a homesteader, I am in a situation where doing that is difficult at the moment as I currently don’t own my own residence and would much prefer to have property that I own. But I’ll need a lot more money if I am going buy my own property; I also need to make connections with the local farming community in my area in order better develop the farming skills I need. (I am working on those by myself, but obviously, I could really use some in-person instruction and advice) Also a lot of other issues are interfering with my endeavour.

Please pray for me that I can get everything I need and become a homesteader and have an independent life. (I’d also really appreciate it if I could find my future wife in the process and have a family)

I will pray for you!  I would recommend working at or volunteering at a farm so you can learn on the job.  We are a homesteading family and have learned a lot through trial and error.  We have pretty much done it all on our own.  I have taken some classes and read lots of books.  But you can only learn so much from books, blogs, and classes.  Farmers are a very friendly and helpful bunch.  If you called someone on the type of farm/homestead you would like to have and offered to come regularly to help -  I am sure someone would take you up on it!  I would!   My daughter gets her horse lessons by working around her trainers farm.  I went and helped a lady that runs a micro dairy in town to learn more about goats and how she manages her compost.  Hands on experience is the best teacher!
Prayers coming.
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#3
(04-21-2021, 06:08 PM)CatholicMamato5 Wrote: I will pray for you!  I would recommend working at or volunteering at a farm so you can learn on the job.  We are a homesteading family and have learned a lot through trial and error.  We have pretty much done it all on our own.  I have taken some classes and read lots of books.  But you can only learn so much from books, blogs, and classes.  Farmers are a very friendly and helpful bunch.  If you called someone on the type of farm/homestead you would like to have and offered to come regularly to help -  I am sure someone would take you up on it!  I would!   My daughter gets her horse lessons by working around her trainers farm.  I went and helped a lady that runs a micro dairy in town to learn more about goats and how she manages her compost.  Hands on experience is the best teacher!
Prayers coming.

On the subject, do you recommend purchasing land on its own or a house with ample space from the get-go? I'm an newbie engineer working in a fairly rural area but I can't even afford 2 acres of residential land, let alone anything a stone's toss away from town.

Heck, do you even recommend attempting it if you're single? I'd like to be atleast at the level where I'd survive with my neighbors if the government just disintegrated one day but it's a tad frustrating even getting prepper gear for two months. I've got decent skills but it's mostly design.
With no king to rule me I owe my fealty only to God.
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#4
Recently I have been listening to some Toby Hemenway talks as research for the permaculture classes that I am teaching. In one of them I came upon the point he brings up about horticultural societies of history being examples of permacultural societies. Specifically, he mentions three examples in the particular talk: the milpa tenders of Mesoamerica, the Hopewell in North America, and the Jōmon in Japan. These were people who tended the wild/semi-wild plants & animals around them (in contrast, agriculturalists fully domesticated plants & animals). In other words, horticulturalists are gardeners; agriculturalists are farmers. Horticulturalists lived in the mountains, hills & foothills (in contrast, agriculturalists live in valleys). Horticultural societies reached high levels of culture. The Jōmon period lasted for 13,000 years, a few millennia longer than agriculture. Here are some more traits found in each:

Horticultural people... do some hunting & some agriculture, but they're really in an intermediate ground between agricultural & hunter-gatherer societies.
Horticulture is the practice of "culturing plants" not "culturing fields",
Horticulturalists tend polycultures,
Horticulturalists encourage succession,
Horticulturalists love shrubs, trees & vines,
Horticulture ecosystems still function,
Horticultural societies locate spirit right here on earth. They tend to be spiritually grounded right here on the planet,
The forest is where horticulturalists get most things: "the forest is my Wal-Mart" – Central Asian man,
Horticultural hill dwelling people grow polycultures (tubers, bananas, beans - all much harder to measure). Hill folk don't grow as much grain as valley folk,
Foothill people grow maize. Their primary hillside grain is usually maize/corn, but they didn't grow as much grain as valley dwellers,
Forest gardeners & milpa tenders were seen by Western scientists as "hunter-gatherers" because they couldn't easily [see and] measure the value of their polycultures. Westerners saw the "wild" even though it was an incredibly sophisticated & manipulated food forest that behaved like an ecosystem,
Food forests have multiple yields & multiple benefits happening all at once,
Horticultural societies have much flatter hierarchies,
Horticultural rulers rule by competence rather than by force,
Horticultural societies have processes for removing rulers,
Foraging & Horticultural societies have specific mechanisms in place to stop "aggrandizers", people who are making themselves "grand" (aka: status seekers, bullies, accumulators of material goods),
Horticultural societies have a culture of conservation,
Horticultural societies have a culture of cooperation.

Agricultural people have fully domesticated plants, animals, & themselves...
Agricultural societies develop technology, granaries, processing,
Agricultural societies form sedentary cultures,
Agricultural societies need police & armies to protect communal grain silos/stores,
Agricultural societies have Lords (hierarchy) to decide who gets grain. The word 'Lord' is a portmanteau of Loaf+Ward (the keeper of the grain). The person who controls the grain, literally,
Agricultural societies have accountants to measure trade,
Agricultural societies have a ruling elite,
Deities in agricultural societies are "somewhere else" usually in the sky,
Renaissance/Enlightenment: rationality – data, proof > received knowledge,
The state sees the forest only as timber/fuel (eg. Romans cleared North African forests for building warships, etc.),
Scientifically managed forests arise. Forest = military power,
A king can look at a forest & ask "When can this forest grow me enough timber to build warships to beat that king over there?" & Charcoal to build weapons,
As agricultural societies began to dominate forest dwellers, people no longer made a living in the woods. Industrialization occurred,
The state has rationalized the forest, making it "legible" so you know exactly what is there. You can "read" it. You make a village legible so you know who owns what. This facilitates taxation,
Eliminated communal land tenure (The Commons) because value cannot easily be assessed. Eg. Enclosure Acts in England: created rich land owners, barons, landlords, etc,
Land ownership simplified taxation. The Great Wall of China was to keep taxpayers in. Outside the Great Wall was "wild" = not taxed,
Civilizations formed in valleys: flat, navigable bodies of water – the state can easily control them,
Valleys became state-controlled areas with grain-growing people,
Valley people grow grains because they're storable, transport well, lightweight, easily measure its yield in a field,
Agricultural societies worship aggrandizers (accumulators),
Agricultural societies adopt a reductionist worldview,
There is no ecosystem on the planet that over the past 10,000 as use for agriculture, that is better because agriculture was there.
-Toby Hemenway, Liberation Permaculture (Permaculture Voices by Diego Footer) (Hi there this is a paste of an article from (permies.com) I must say Jesus is King of Kings and Lord of Lords . It's truly amazing how Jesus spoke to different types of societies through the Gospels. He would mention he is the vine , or separating the wheat from the chauff , the good Shepherd . Also pay unto Cesar what is Cesar's , unto God what belongs to God. Store up your treasure in Heaven , Ask and you shall receive , knock and the door will be opened . May God's will surround you in this time of need and bless you with a worthy helper .
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#5
(04-21-2021, 10:04 PM)Suggestions Wrote: Recently I have been listening to some Toby Hemenway talks as research for the permaculture classes that I am teaching. In one of them I came upon the point he brings up about horticultural societies of history being examples of permacultural societies. Specifically, he mentions three examples in the particular talk: the milpa tenders of Mesoamerica, the Hopewell in North America, and the Jōmon in Japan. These were people who tended the wild/semi-wild plants & animals around them (in contrast, agriculturalists fully domesticated plants & animals). In other words, horticulturalists are gardeners; agriculturalists are farmers. Horticulturalists lived in the mountains, hills & foothills (in contrast, agriculturalists live in valleys). Horticultural societies reached high levels of culture. The Jōmon period lasted for 13,000 years, a few millennia longer than agriculture. Here are some more traits found in each:

Horticultural people... do some hunting & some agriculture, but they're really in an intermediate ground between agricultural & hunter-gatherer societies.
Horticulture is the practice of "culturing plants" not "culturing fields",
Horticulturalists tend polycultures,
Horticulturalists encourage succession,
Horticulturalists love shrubs, trees & vines,
Horticulture ecosystems still function,
Horticultural societies locate spirit right here on earth. They tend to be spiritually grounded right here on the planet,
The forest is where horticulturalists get most things: "the forest is my Wal-Mart" – Central Asian man,
Horticultural hill dwelling people grow polycultures (tubers, bananas, beans - all much harder to measure). Hill folk don't grow as much grain as valley folk,
Foothill people grow maize. Their primary hillside grain is usually maize/corn, but they didn't grow as much grain as valley dwellers,
Forest gardeners & milpa tenders were seen by Western scientists as "hunter-gatherers" because they couldn't easily [see and] measure the value of their polycultures. Westerners saw the "wild" even though it was an incredibly sophisticated & manipulated food forest that behaved like an ecosystem,
Food forests have multiple yields & multiple benefits happening all at once,
Horticultural societies have much flatter hierarchies,
Horticultural rulers rule by competence rather than by force,
Horticultural societies have processes for removing rulers,
Foraging & Horticultural societies have specific mechanisms in place to stop "aggrandizers", people who are making themselves "grand" (aka: status seekers, bullies, accumulators of material goods),
Horticultural societies have a culture of conservation,
Horticultural societies have a culture of cooperation.

Agricultural people have fully domesticated plants, animals, & themselves...
Agricultural societies develop technology, granaries, processing,
Agricultural societies form sedentary cultures,
Agricultural societies need police & armies to protect communal grain silos/stores,
Agricultural societies have Lords (hierarchy) to decide who gets grain. The word 'Lord' is a portmanteau of Loaf+Ward (the keeper of the grain). The person who controls the grain, literally,
Agricultural societies have accountants to measure trade,
Agricultural societies have a ruling elite,
Deities in agricultural societies are "somewhere else" usually in the sky,
Renaissance/Enlightenment: rationality – data, proof > received knowledge,
The state sees the forest only as timber/fuel (eg. Romans cleared North African forests for building warships, etc.),
Scientifically managed forests arise. Forest = military power,
A king can look at a forest & ask "When can this forest grow me enough timber to build warships to beat that king over there?" & Charcoal to build weapons,
As agricultural societies began to dominate forest dwellers, people no longer made a living in the woods. Industrialization occurred,
The state has rationalized the forest, making it "legible" so you know exactly what is there. You can "read" it. You make a village legible so you know who owns what. This facilitates taxation,
Eliminated communal land tenure (The Commons) because value cannot easily be assessed. Eg. Enclosure Acts in England: created rich land owners, barons, landlords, etc,
Land ownership simplified taxation. The Great Wall of China was to keep taxpayers in. Outside the Great Wall was "wild" = not taxed,
Civilizations formed in valleys: flat, navigable bodies of water – the state can easily control them,
Valleys became state-controlled areas with grain-growing people,
Valley people grow grains because they're storable, transport well, lightweight, easily measure its yield in a field,
Agricultural societies worship aggrandizers (accumulators),
Agricultural societies adopt a reductionist worldview,
There is no ecosystem on the planet that over the past 10,000 as use for agriculture, that is better because agriculture was there.
-Toby Hemenway, Liberation Permaculture (Permaculture Voices by Diego Footer)          (Hi there this is a paste of an article from (permies.com) I must say  Jesus is King of Kings and Lord of Lords . It's truly amazing how Jesus spoke to different types of societies through the Gospels.  He would mention he is the vine , or separating the wheat from the chauff , the good Shepherd . Also pay unto Cesar what is Cesar's , unto God what belongs to God. Store up your treasure in Heaven , Ask and you shall receive , knock and the door will be opened . May God's will surround you in this time of need and bless you with a worthy helper .


That is really interesting Suggestions!  Thanks.  I have taken a permaculture design class and do try to use permaculture principles on our little homestead here.  I have never looked deeper into the history of it.  You have provided great info. and I am interested to go deeper into this topic.
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#6
(04-21-2021, 07:33 PM)HedgeKnight Wrote: On the subject, do you recommend purchasing land on its own or a house with ample space from the get-go? I'm an newbie engineer working in a fairly rural area but I can't even afford 2 acres of residential land, let alone anything a stone's toss away from town.

Heck, do you even recommend attempting it if you're single? I'd like to be at least at the level where I'd survive with my neighbors if the government just disintegrated one day but it's a tad frustrating even getting prepper gear for two months. I've got decent skills but it's mostly design.

We bought a house on 6 acres.  The land had been used for horses and alpacas before we moved here.  There were some flower gardens but everything was severely overgrown.  We have been here for almost 8 years and things are still severely overgrown in many areas.  We just can't tackle it all.  We have been working for 8 years to improve things but my husband can only help on Saturdays and my children are not as eager little farm hands as I had hoped!  They do their "chores" but don't excitedly jump into new projects - unless they are baby animals.  

I think you should pray first and evaluate your level of commitment.  What do you have time for?  What do you have a passion for?  I really enjoy this way of living but you do give up some leisure time if you really want to make a go of things.  You can actually do quite a lot on a small piece of land if you are efficient.  There is a woman in my town who runs an organic micro dairy.  She has goats and milks them and sells the milk and cheese.  She has chickens and ducks.  She composts everything and also has organic gardens.  She sells her veggies to local restaurants.  I think she has less than an acre.  She is just really efficient and intentional about what she is doing.  We garden and it is a priority for me.  I currently have seedlings growing all over my house that need to be planted in a few weeks.  The garden will be my spring - fall work.  It is a lot of work but I enjoy it.  I am not really that good at it but I have learned quite a bit by making mistakes over the years and I get better.  We also raise some animals.  I really enjoy my Nigerian dwarf goats.  they help clear brush, we can milk them, and they can provide return on investment when we sell the kids.  We raised pigs for the first time last year.  It went well.  They are excellent at clearing land and we are putting them in wooded areas that we want to reclaim.  They pull out brush and roots and church up the soil.  We raised enough to put meat in our freezer and that of a few friends.  I have bees but I am not very good at them either.  I have a friend that loves beekeeping and is successful at it.  I learned I do not love beekeeping but I love honey and I love what they do for my fruit trees and garden.  We have an arrangement now where she comes and maintains my hives and we split the honey.  We raise chickens and ducks for both meat and eggs.

I guess my long winded response can be summarized by saying - if you feel called towards homesteading, I find it a worthy life!  You can also improve your house but you cannot increase your land easily, so I would find a small (maybe even a fixer upper) house on a nice piece of land.  You don't need a ton of land if you are efficient.  Think about what you want to have on your homestead.  Do you want to raise animals for meat?  Rabbits, Chickens, and other poultry do not require much space.  Goats and pigs do very well in brushy, wooded areas.  

Since this was a prayer request, I will just stop here.  But I LOVE to talk homesteading, animals and gardening and am happy to chat, answer questions, share my mistakes and successes so feel free to send me a message.

God bless!
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#7
Joel Salatin (politics aside) is knowledgeable with practical business ideas.

Quote:He is a self-described "Christian libertarian environmentalist capitalist lunatic farmer" produces meat he describes as "beyond organic", which are raised using what the farm describes as environmentally responsible, ecologically beneficial, sustainable agriculture.
-Wikipedia
Oh, where are the snows of yesteryear!
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