What was the worst job you've ever had?
#11
I used to work in an Office which dealt principally with acquiring foreign labour for agricultural and commercial businesses. 

I was given little training about what to do, was totally clueless about how to go about my daily functions. I really felt lost, and was on the verge of quitting within the first month or two, just because I so detested the job, but I couldn't bring myself to do it (I didn't want my family to think that I was a worthless good-for-nothing.)

I felt so guilty about being a bad worker, but kept the job to make my family happy. I put on tonnes of weight and started getting stressed when people were disappointed with the low quality work I was producing. I also struggled with a pretty bad scrupulosity at the time, and basically had convinced myself that I was going to hell because of my bad work, so I would panic about that.

My girlfriend (now wife) told me that I seemed so disappointed and discontent. I was.

Finally, I broke down emotionally (this was attached to a lot of other things which were happening in my life at the time as well) and quit. I never felt happier in my life. It was the worst job that I ever worked and I would never step one foot back in those doors.

I eventually got a job working grueling physically labour in the temperatures exceeding 100 Fahrenheit, working final assembly in a manufacturing plant. I sweat awful everyday, came home covered in metal fillings, and was tired. I loved it. Probably my favourite job, aside from the old men who complained about how things weren't like what they used to be.
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#12
(05-07-2021, 12:48 AM)jovan66102 Wrote:
(05-07-2021, 12:39 AM)Blind Horus Wrote: Never really had a hardest job being workshy but I've known a few people who have. Farmers for one. As a friend of mine who was raised on a farm (are children even raised anymore?) once told me: after working on a farm every job he had afterwards was easy. As far a the shovel goes I call it a blister stick and spring is blister season -and- as one of of my more scurrilous friends once told me during a discussion on the finer points of shovelling: if he had a daughter he wouldn't allow her to marry a man who didn't know the correct way to use a shovel. Of course he always was mostly just talk...

I was raised on a farm, doing all the normal things, bucking bales, shovelling grain, etc., but nothing I ever did on the farm came close in sheer, backbreaking, hard labour to finding that water leak!
Oh Jonvan I know about leaky pipes on dark rainy nights. For 20 years I helped on my father's place. It was, for lack of a better word, an Art Farm. 7 to 10 studios, shacks, cabins, trailers and sheds, all plumbed and wired by him. It was quite a tangled and sometimes leaky mess. Since he was getting on in years I was on call 24/7 and in 20 years I spent only one night away from there, (and on that night there was a fire). It may seem like the worst job but I don't know, he helped so many people (lowest rent $75 highest $375). Many were Vietnam vets and California refugees in the beginning but later on mostly just people struggling to get by. The County eventually shut him down, and like he liked to gripe: they would rather see them living under bridges. He was a Great Depression boy, and believe me, young people today will look back someday and say: I remember the Great Reset...
Oh, where are the snows of yesteryear!
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#13
(05-07-2021, 02:44 AM)Justin Tertius Wrote: I used to work in an Office which dealt principally with acquiring foreign labour for agricultural and commercial businesses. 

I was given little training about what to do, was totally clueless about how to go about my daily functions. I really felt lost, and was on the verge of quitting within the first month or two, just because I so detested the job, but I couldn't bring myself to do it (I didn't want my family to think that I was a worthless good-for-nothing.)

I felt so guilty about being a bad worker, but kept the job to make my family happy. I put on tonnes of weight and started getting stressed when people were disappointed with the low quality work I was producing. I also struggled with a pretty bad scrupulosity at the time, and basically had convinced myself that I was going to hell because of my bad work, so I would panic about that.

My girlfriend (now wife) told me that I seemed so disappointed and discontent. I was.

Finally, I broke down emotionally (this was attached to a lot of other things which were happening in my life at the time as well) and quit. I never felt happier in my life. It was the worst job that I ever worked and I would never step one foot back in those doors.

I eventually got a job working grueling physically labour in the temperatures exceeding 100 Fahrenheit, working final assembly in a manufacturing plant. I sweat awful everyday, came home covered in metal fillings, and was tired. I loved it. Probably my favourite job, aside from the old men who complained about how things weren't like what they used to be.

More power to you! I also worked in a grinding shop for a year, and while it had it's moments, I was pretty miserable working in hot temperatures, with fiberglass dust flying in my face, and having to wear a respirator all the time. I seem to buck the trend in that I find office work a big relief, and most manual labor grueling.

As for the original question, the worst job I ever had was at McDonalds. I usually worked in the back where all the smells of processed food commingled. It was very hot and very cramped. I nearly vomited the first day I worked there, and felt nauseous for an entire week after that.
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#14
Several people have mentioned hot temperatures, but no one has mentioned cold. I may have worked in two jobs that represent the most extreme temperature differences in employment that anyone has ever experienced.

When I lived in Canada, I had a walking paper route. One night I walked my route in windchills of minus 55 degrees Fahrenheit.

On the other extreme, many years ago, I had a job in a Nabisco factory making those little peanut-shaped peanut butter cookies. My job required almost zero physical labour but it was horrible! I stood at the mouth of an oven for eight hours a day, slightly moving a handle so that the cookies lined up for the packaging machine. The oven was about the length of a football field with a conveyor belt running through it.

There was a thermometer about halfway down the length of the oven that registered between 160 and 165 degrees Fahrenheit. I don't know how hot it was where I was standing, but it was hotter than that. Between every two ovens, there was a water fountain and a salt pill dispenser. You could step away from your oven for a few seconds, gulp a salt pill and drink your fill of water.

They supplied uniforms. At the end of the day, I'd wring out my uniform (literally!) and take a shower. I'd finish with a few minutes under cold water. I'd then dress in my street clothes and leave the plant. It was during the summer. The ambient temperature was near 100 degrees F. As I walked out of the building, I would start to shiver because my core temp was so high that I felt like it was cold.

The worst thing was that most people only lasted a day or two in the oven room before they refused to work there or quit. Not me! I was a conscientious worker and I stuck it out until I was transferred into the rest of the plant, which was all air conditioned.
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#15
I'm surprised about Nabisco, because my parents had good friends who worked at the Chicago plant when I was little, and a guy at my church's parents worked there as well. They started there and stayed till they retired. Thought it was a great place to work.  Best job I ever had was for a bakery as well, IBC-Wonder Bread.
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#16
(05-09-2021, 08:48 PM)Eric F Wrote: I'm surprised about Nabisco, because my parents had good friends who worked at the Chicago plant when I was little, and a guy at my church's parents worked there as well. They started there and stayed till they retired. Thought it was a great place to work.  Best job I ever had was for a bakery as well, IBC-Wonder Bread.

It was a good place to work, as long as you weren't one of the few people in the oven room. The rest of the plant was air-conditioned. I can't even really blame them for not having A/C in the oven room. It was a massive room. I wouldn't want to think what it would have added to the price of the product if they had put A/C in there. 

The pay was good, and except in the oven room, working conditions were quite good.

That was 45 years ago. I should think by now they'd automated the process, removing the need for workers spending eight hours a day in that heat.
Jovan-Marya of the Immaculate Conception Weismiller, T.O.Carm.

Vive le Christ-roi! Vive le roi, Louis XX!
Deum timete, regem honorificate.
Kansan by birth! Albertan by choice! Jayhawk by the Grace of God!
“Qui me amat, amet et canem meum. (Who loves me will love my dog.)” 
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My Blog 'Musings of an Old Curmudgeon'
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#17
I don't have a worst job, but every job had it's challenges.

I was a pizza cook in high school. I really enjoyed this job, a lot. I worked late sometimes, which made staying awake in class a bit difficult.

I served 21 years in the Army, and while there were times when it wasn't very pleasant, I wouldn't change what I did. Getting dysentery in the Middle East and breaking some bones in a parachuting accident were a couple of low points. An as a medic, it can be hard when you lose a patient.

I worked contract security for 12 years, mostly as a manager. Mostly boring with a bit of excitement here and there.

Retired at 50.
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#18
(05-07-2021, 08:19 PM)jovan66102 Wrote: When I lived in Canada, I had a walking paper route. One night I walked my route in windchills of minus 55 degrees Fahrenheit.

I hear ya.  I was part of a joint military exercise in Petawawa Canada, in January.  So cold.
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#19
(05-09-2021, 11:42 PM)jack89 Wrote: I hear ya.  I was part of a joint military exercise in Petawawa Canada, in January.  So cold.

Yeah, even tho' Edmonton is a few hundred miles further north, the temperatures are similar. Of course, compared to the High North, they're balmy. One winter they were talking about how we were breaking records set about 20 years before. A friend asked what year that was. When I told him, he thought for a minute and said he had missed the 'warm weather'. He had spent that winter on Ellesmere Island, in Nunavut, about 500 miles south of the North Pole! The average low in December and January is around minus 35-40 F. The record for December is minus 68 F., and for January it's minus 64 F.

The entire population of the island is less than 200.
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Vive le Christ-roi! Vive le roi, Louis XX!
Deum timete, regem honorificate.
Kansan by birth! Albertan by choice! Jayhawk by the Grace of God!
“Qui me amat, amet et canem meum. (Who loves me will love my dog.)” 
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My Blog 'Musings of an Old Curmudgeon'
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