Dictionaries in Greek and in Hebrew.
#1
I take a look at Latin from time to time but now I want to know more about Greek and Hebrew. I think this will come in handy someday and I want to know any recommendations for dictionaries. Good books to read in Latin, Greek and Hebrew are welcome too especially if they are written by the saints. If you know any prayers in Greek and Hebrew I'd appreciate it too.
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#2
Are you interested in Koine Greek or modern Greek?

I personally use my phone to look up Greek words, simply because it is faster than using my physical copy of a dictionary. There are plenty of apps out there, but Google usually does the trick if you switch over to a greek keyboard.

As for prayers, you could just get a Greek prayer book where you will find psalms, prayers written by the early fathers etc. The name of the saint is usually written above the prayer itself. You could also try and learn the prayers of the Divine Liturgy according to St. John Chrysostom. Another option is to get a copy of an interlinear Bible. The Didache should also be pretty easy to find, and you could compare it with an English translation (if that is your first language).

The first thing would be to learn the alphabet, of course.

Good luck!
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  • Mr. Cowboy
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#3
What's the difference between Koine Greek and... the other thing that is Greek and yet is something else?

No, I need at least a digital copy of a dictionary as I do not know if the internet will last. I am not even confident if the electricity will keep running so I will have to prepare. I desire a dictionary that is in the public domain, if possible, and if not it is my wish that I should at least be able to borrow this dictionary. I'll look into these prayers that you have mentioned. I'll learn the alphabet and how to count too.

As for the rest, I will consider what you have said carefully.

EDIT: I've changed my mind, I think I will stick with Latin. And if I have to learn Greek and Hebrew I will only learn only the alphabet, the numbers and possibly a few words. I think that is all that will be necessary for now.
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#4
(07-04-2021, 11:27 PM)Mr. Cowboy Wrote: What's the difference between Koine Greek and... the other thing that is Greek and yet is something else?

No, I need at least a digital copy of a dictionary as I do not know if the internet will last. I am not even confident if the electricity will keep running so I will have to prepare. I desire a dictionary that is in the public domain, if possible, and if not it is my wish that I should at least be able to borrow this dictionary. I'll look into these prayers that you have mentioned. I'll learn the alphabet and how to count too.

As for the rest, I will consider what you have said carefully.

EDIT: I've changed my mind, I think I will stick with Latin. And if I have to learn Greek and Hebrew I will only learn only the alphabet, the numbers and possibly a few words. I think that is all that will be necessary for now.

Languages evolve and change and Koine Greek is a term used to describe the language as it was used before the Middle Ages and as it to some extent still is used in the Church. I was assuming that you wanted to learn how to read old texts, such as the New Testament, in its original language, but I wanted to make sure. 

Good luck with your studies! 
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