Fr Josiah Trenham: Weaponizing the Eucharist?
#1
Fr Josiah Trenham give the traditional Catholic/Orthodox teaching on the Eucharist and who should receive it or be denied: 
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#2
The Orthodox are better than Catholics at "guarding the chalice."  The priest has to know you and know you have recently been to confession before he will give you the Eucharist.
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#3
(07-10-2021, 05:14 PM)Clare Brigid Wrote: The priest has to know you and know you have recently been to confession before he will give you the Eucharist.

I see the logic in that, but it strikes me as odd.  Do they take into account travelling, overseas service, other (legitimately) extenuating circumstances?
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#4
(07-12-2021, 03:02 PM)Jeeter Wrote:
(07-10-2021, 05:14 PM)Clare Brigid Wrote: The priest has to know you and know you have recently been to confession before he will give you the Eucharist.

I see the logic in that, but it strikes me as odd.  Do they take into account travelling, overseas service, other (legitimately) extenuating circumstances?
Yes.  If you know you're traveling, etc. you're encouraged to contact the priest before the time of the Divine Liturgy.  This can be done by phone or email, or preferably by attending the Vespers Service on Saturday evening.  Meet the priest, tell him your situation, and receive the Sacrament of Repentance (Confession) if he deems it necessary.

Sometimes, if all the above are not possible, if you arrive at the church early on Sunday morning, before or for Matins, you may be able to introduce yourself to the priest and, if necessary, receive the Sacrament of Repentance.

All that seems to work very, very well.

I would think people serving overseas have some kind of arrangements within their branch of service.  If not, the same kind of thing above would probably apply, though language might be an issue.

Worst case scenario, you are unable to meet the priest and just do not receive the Eucharist that Sunday.  You may, however, approach the cup for a blessing, stating something like "Just a blessing, Father."
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#6
J Michael Wrote:
Jeeter Wrote:
Clare Brigid Wrote:The priest has to know you and know you have recently been to confession before he will give you the Eucharist.

I see the logic in that, but it strikes me as odd.  Do they take into account travelling, overseas service, other (legitimately) extenuating circumstances?
Yes.  If you know you're traveling, etc. you're encouraged to contact the priest before the time of the Divine Liturgy.  This can be done by phone or email, or preferably by attending the Vespers Service on Saturday evening.  Meet the priest, tell him your situation, and receive the Sacrament of Repentance (Confession) if he deems it necessary.

Sometimes, if all the above are not possible, if you arrive at the church early on Sunday morning, before or for Matins, you may be able to introduce yourself to the priest and, if necessary, receive the Sacrament of Repentance.

All that seems to work very, very well.

I would think people serving overseas have some kind of arrangements within their branch of service.  If not, the same kind of thing above would probably apply, though language might be an issue.

Worst case scenario, you are unable to meet the priest and just do not receive the Eucharist that Sunday.  You may, however, approach the cup for a blessing, stating something like "Just a blessing, Father."

Yes, this is my experience.  When I was Orthodox, I traveled to Florida for my niece's wedding.  Beforehand, I found an OCA church in the area and emailed the pastor, informing him when I had last been to confession.  At the Divine Liturgy the following Sunday he commended me during his sermon and told his congregation how I had done the right thing in contacting him ahead of time.
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#7
(07-12-2021, 08:36 PM)Clare Brigid Wrote: Yes, this is my experience.  When I was Orthodox, I traveled to Florida for my niece's wedding.  Beforehand, I found an OCA church in the area and emailed the pastor, informing him when I had last been to confession.  At the Divine Liturgy the following Sunday he commended me during his sermon and told his congregation how I had done the right thing in contacting him ahead of time.

Wow! Compared to my experience in the Serbian Church, the OCA seems lax. We were expected to confess before every Communion. There were two Serbian Churches in town, but because of politics, there was absolutely NO Church hopping. (Changing Churches in most cases would have entailed changing your family and friends as well.)

As a result, the Pastor knew everyone. If you hadn't been to confession after Vespers on Saturday you didn't receive Communion. If travellers couldn't make it to Vespers, they were expected not to receive.
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#8
(07-12-2021, 09:12 PM)jovan66102 Wrote:
(07-12-2021, 08:36 PM)Clare Brigid Wrote: Yes, this is my experience.  When I was Orthodox, I traveled to Florida for my niece's wedding.  Beforehand, I found an OCA church in the area and emailed the pastor, informing him when I had last been to confession.  At the Divine Liturgy the following Sunday he commended me during his sermon and told his congregation how I had done the right thing in contacting him ahead of time.

Wow! Compared to my experience in the Serbian Church, the OCA seems lax. We were expected to confess before every Communion. There were two Serbian Churches in town, but because of politics, there was absolutely NO Church hopping. (Changing Churches in most cases would have entailed changing your family and friends as well.)

As a result, the Pastor knew everyone. If you hadn't been to confession after Vespers on Saturday you didn't receive Communion. If travellers couldn't make it to Vespers, they were expected not to receive.

When your theology doesn't have the concepts of mortal and venial sin (I live in the Byzantine Rite and admit I still think this way, but I don't impose it on anyone), and you have a medieval church culture where the people only go to Communion once to four times a year, then mandatory confession before Communion makes sense. ROCOR is big on requiring Vespers before Communion too; it varies by parish.
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