Can A Catholic Worship At Orthodox Liturgies?
(10-02-2021, 08:44 PM)AlNg777 Wrote: I doubt that Pope St. John Paul II committed a sin when he attended Orthodox Divine Liturgy on May 9, 1999 in Romania. I don't see how it can be a sin to attend an Orthodox Liturgy when you have Catholic Saints doing such. Please support your contention that it is a sin for a Roman Catholic to attend Orthodox Liturgy. What are your references for this? Also do you say it is a mortal sin or a venial sin?

And that right there is the problem with John Paul II's canonisation. Will it be okay to give adulterers Communion if the next Pope gives us another St Francis? Will atheists suddenly start going to heaven because a saint said they do?

First, it's not dogma that canonisations are infallible; second, if they are, and the reason for it is that if they're not, the Church could be honouring someone in its public liturgy, who is damned, and asking for his intercession, then all canonisation means is a guarantee that person is in heaven. While traditionally there was a thorough investigation and the least fault or error could end the cause, that's no longer the case. John Paul II canonised more people than all previous Popes together, and greatly sped up the process. But even saints can sin, as long as they repent before death. And none of us know what he confessed in the Sacrament of Penance.

It's not always a sin to attend non-Catholic worship services - one may, for example, attend a wedding or funeral of a non-Catholic friend or family member. St Alphonsus Liguori summed it up: 'It is not permitted to be present at the sacred rites of infidels and heretics in such a way that you would be judged to be in communion with them.' Pius XI, in Mortalium animos, wrote, 'So, Venerable Brethren, it is clear why this Apostolic See has never allowed its subjects to take part in the assemblies of non-Catholics: for the union of Christians can only be promoted by promoting the return to the one true Church of Christ of those who are separated from it, for in the past they have unhappily left it.'

It wouldn't be a sin to attend a non-Catholic liturgy just to see what it's like, although one who isn't strong in his faith could be tempted by that and should avoid it. I don't know what the circumstances of John Paul II's visit to Romania were, but it wouldn't necessarily be a sin to be present, especially if nobody will think the Pope is saying there's a unity there that doesn't exist.

Curious, though, how many of those in the clergy who say it's schismatic and mortal sin to attend the traditional Roman Rite celebrated by the SSPX or sedevacantists or other groups have no problem with Catholics attending Orthodox or Anglican or Lutheran liturgies.
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