What's a good way to learn Linux?
#11
(08-11-2021, 03:01 PM)Anon777 Wrote:
(08-11-2021, 02:57 PM)Anon777 Wrote:
(08-11-2021, 02:51 PM)Orthodox Andy Wrote:
(08-11-2021, 02:46 PM)Anon777 Wrote:
(08-11-2021, 02:43 PM)Orthodox Andy Wrote:
(08-11-2021, 02:35 PM)Anon777 Wrote: What is linux?

It's an operating system, like Windows or MacOS. In the 1960s, engineers at Bell Labs created UNIX, which was a computer operating system. In the 1990s, a college student in Finland, Linus Torvalds created his own operating system called Linux, which is based off of UNIX. It performs a lot of the same functions as any operating system, with some key differences:

-The source code is open for anyone to view and modify.

-Being the administrator is not the default mode in Linux. Hence every change to the computer has to be explicitly authorized by the user.

-There is one root folder in Linux, as opposed to the C:, D:, etc drives in Windows.

I'm not a Linux expert, so those are just a few of the differences that I remember. If I got something wrong on here, please feel free to correct me, Linux regulars.
what is a root folder? and what is c:,D:, drives

and what is source code?

The source code is the set of instructions that makes the computer actually usable, to perform functions like displaying graphics, performing calculations, processing text, etc.

The root folder is just that--the root of where all files and programs are stored. In Windows, each hard drive/partition will have a letter assigned to it, totally separate from other letters. Most Windows users by default have everything stored in the C: folder, but many people, like me, have added an additional hard drive to my computer, which gives me a D: folder. Other devices like USB sticks or disk drives would also show up as a letter, like G:,E:, etc. Likewise, in Linux, everything is contained in *one* root folder, and every storage location is derivative of that.

Linus Tech Tips has some good videos on tech basics.

I do not understand what the blimey he is talking about? it is all bizarre jargon.
I am 24 years old but am techwise (Almost) completely illiterate. I STILL DO NOT understand why people like smartphones so freaking much. I hate touchscreens and always have. I do not understand have of what the button on my keyboard do or for

Computers are just essentially boxes that perform calculations and make decisions using logic gates. Imagine making a game with mechanical switches for a dialogue tree. Where one condition has to be met to move on to the next decision tree. It's basically the same thing with a computer, but instead of a dialogue tree, it's numerical calculations, and instead of mechanical switches, it's tiny transistors (electrical switches) burned onto a microchip, which has billions of these switches that perform calculations billions of times a second, hence the "Hertz" when talking about chips. Hertz means cycle, so higher numbers means more calculation cycles per second. Computers from the 1990s typically operated in the megahertz (millions) range, while computers from the 1980s and earlier usually operated in the Kilohertz (Hundreds) range. Modern computers usually tend to be in the gigahertz (billions) range.
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#12
(08-11-2021, 03:08 PM)Orthodox Andy Wrote:
(08-11-2021, 03:01 PM)Anon777 Wrote:
(08-11-2021, 02:57 PM)Anon777 Wrote:
(08-11-2021, 02:51 PM)Orthodox Andy Wrote:
(08-11-2021, 02:46 PM)Anon777 Wrote:
(08-11-2021, 02:43 PM)Orthodox Andy Wrote:
(08-11-2021, 02:35 PM)Anon777 Wrote: What is linux?

It's an operating system, like Windows or MacOS. In the 1960s, engineers at Bell Labs created UNIX, which was a computer operating system. In the 1990s, a college student in Finland, Linus Torvalds created his own operating system called Linux, which is based off of UNIX. It performs a lot of the same functions as any operating system, with some key differences:

-The source code is open for anyone to view and modify.

-Being the administrator is not the default mode in Linux. Hence every change to the computer has to be explicitly authorized by the user.

-There is one root folder in Linux, as opposed to the C:, D:, etc drives in Windows.

I'm not a Linux expert, so those are just a few of the differences that I remember. If I got something wrong on here, please feel free to correct me, Linux regulars.
what is a root folder? and what is c:,D:, drives

and what is source code?

The source code is the set of instructions that makes the computer actually usable, to perform functions like displaying graphics, performing calculations, processing text, etc.

The root folder is just that--the root of where all files and programs are stored. In Windows, each hard drive/partition will have a letter assigned to it, totally separate from other letters. Most Windows users by default have everything stored in the C: folder, but many people, like me, have added an additional hard drive to my computer, which gives me a D: folder. Other devices like USB sticks or disk drives would also show up as a letter, like G:,E:, etc. Likewise, in Linux, everything is contained in *one* root folder, and every storage location is derivative of that.

Linus Tech Tips has some good videos on tech basics.

I do not understand what the blimey he is talking about? it is all bizarre jargon.
I am 24 years old but am techwise (Almost) completely illiterate. I STILL DO NOT understand why people like smartphones so freaking much. I hate touchscreens and always have. I do not understand have of what the button on my keyboard do or for

Computers are just essentially boxes that perform calculations and make decisions using logic gates. Imagine making a game with mechanical switches for a dialogue tree. Where one condition has to be met to move on to the next decision tree. It's basically the same thing with a computer, but instead of a dialogue tree, it's numerical calculations, and instead of mechanical switches, it's tiny transistors (electrical switches) burned onto a microchip, which has billions of these switches that perform calculations billions of times a second, hence the "Hertz" when talking about chips. Hertz means cycle, so higher numbers means more calculation cycles per second. Computers from the 1990s typically operated in the megahertz (millions) range, while computers from the 1980s and earlier usually operated in the Kilohertz (Hundreds) range. Modern computers usually tend to be in the gigahertz (billions) range.
I barely understand what you spoke : /
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#13
1 create a free amazon cloud account and fire up a linux image
2 install virtual box or vagrant on windows then fire up a linux instance in tje VM
3 make you windows box dual boot and run windows and linux on your system
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-- attributed to Saint Domenic
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