Thinking about attending Dominican Rite mass
#1
I'm considering attending mass at a parish relatively close to me which is staffed by the Dominican Friars of the Province of the Most Holy Name of Jesus. I've become disillusioned with the NO mass. I've never been able to attend a Tridentine mass (I became Catholic five years ago), and with the recent Summorum Pontificum I feel that any future chances to do so are even more slim. I would rather not have to consider SSPX. From what I've researched, it looks like the Dominican rite (13th century) is even older than the Tridentine mass (1570). There appears to be far fewer resources for the newcomer to the Dominican rite than for the Tridentine mass. So I'm open to any comments or suggestions that you may have. Thank you and God bless.

By the way, here is the link to the parish if you're curious: https://holyrosarypdx.org/
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#2
I don't know the new rite. But I know something about the old rite of the Dominican order.
Until some time ago there was an online pdf of the Dominican Ordo Missae here in a print of 1933.
Now the most recent on line is from 1726
I remember the Mass of the Dominican Order is very short. Rumors have Pius V used their missal privately. Less kneeling and during the last Gospel the altar server would put out the candles so as to leave the assembly exactly at the end of the Mass. The Dominicans have to study and contemplate and can't bother with elaborate lithurgy.
The Psalm 42 (Judica me Deus et discerne causam meam...) of the Mass was absent: after the "Introibo ad altare Dei" there was the Confiteor, where Saint Dominic is mentioned.
The Dominican Scheduling had Pentecost on the first Sunday right after the Most Holy Trinity.
The Friars did Penance from September 14 (Exaltatio crucis) to the Holy Saturday, with the exception of Sundays and other Solemnities.
I don't know what the Dominicans do there, the only thing you can do is to attend Mass.
I think last time this rite was celebrated in my country was when a Czech Friar, Thomas Tyn, from 1985 to 1989 celebrated the old rite in San Domenico, Bologna on Saturday morning, but it was because the Archibishop allowed him to. I think it's reasonable to presume the new rite is a mere translation of the old rite. So you can expect a very short Mass and obviously no guitar, bongoes, and other paraphernalia you find at some N.O. parish. 
P.s. Are you a Dominican tertiary?
Ores, casta legas, jejunes otia vites si servare velis corpora casta Deo.
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#3
Courage!  The reasons that may have moved you to see the issues manifest in the Novus Ordo are likely the same that have moved those who found refuge with the faithful of the FSSPX.  Keep praying, continue to inform your conscience, and stay open to the Holy Ghost.
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#4
Thank you. I'm looking forward to attending the Dominican parish now just due to the fact that their masses seem so much more respectful and reverential compared to the NO mass. I'm not a tertiary, just a Catholic looking for a traditional mass where the focus of the priest and the congregation is on Christ in the tabernacle. I actually witnessed a deacon at one of the NO masses use a super soaker squirt gun on the priest just for laughs. The priest and most of the congregation thought it was funny. 🙄
Note: in my previous post I said Summorum Pontificum when I meant Traditionis Custodes.
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#5
I live in Albany and attend Holy Rosary whenever I am in Portland on Sunday .  The Dominican Rite is very similar to the Roman Rite.  Father gives good homilies too.
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#6
(10-10-2021, 06:21 PM)karl Wrote: I live in Albany and attend Holy Rosary whenever I am in Portland on Sunday .  The Dominican Rite is very similar to the Roman Rite.  Father gives good homilies too.
Holy Rosary provides a print out of the propers in english, but if you are looking for a missal with the propers and ordinary in English and Latin there is one here: https://www.lulu.com/en/us/shop/eastern-dominican-province/the-saint-dominic-missal-i-seasons-of-the-year/paperback/product-1q2zy4p7.html?page=1&pageSize=4
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#7
Wikipedia summarises the differences between the Roman Rite and the Dominican.

From Wikipedia Dominican Rite:

Only the most striking differences between the Dominican Rite and the Roman are mentioned here. The most important is in the manner of celebrating a low Mass. The celebrant in the Dominican Rite wears the amice over his head until the beginning of Mass, and prepares the chalice as soon as he reaches the altar. He says neither the "Introibo ad altare Dei" nor the Psalm "Judica me Deus", instead saying "Confitemini Domino quoniam bonus", with the server responding "Quoniam in saeculum misericordia ejus" ("Praise the Lord for He is good; For His mercy endureth forever."). The Confiteor, much shorter than the Roman, contains the name of St. Dominic. The Gloria and the Credo are begun at the centre of the altar and finished at the Missal. At the Offertory there is a simultaneous oblation of the Host and the chalice and only one prayer, the "Suscipe Sancta Trinitas". The Canon of the Mass is the same as the Canon of the Roman Rite, but the priest holds his hands and arms differently—for some parts of the Canon, his hands are folded, and immediately after the consecration, for the "Unde et Memores", he holds his arms in a cruciform position. The Dominican celebrant also says the "Agnus Dei" immediately after the "Pax Domini" and then recites the prayers "Hæc sacrosancta commixtio", "Domine Iesu Christe" and "Corpus et sanguis", after which follows the Communion, the priest receiving the Host from his left hand. No prayers are said at the consumption of the Precious Blood, the first prayer after the "Corpus et Sanguis" being the Communion
Jovan-Marya of the Immaculate Conception Weismiller, T.O.Carm.

Vive le Christ-roi! Vive le roi, Louis XX!
Deum timete, regem honorificate.
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#8
When I was younger and an altar boy, we had Carmelites in my parish. They had their own rite too. One day, a Dominican priest and a Passionist priest came to my parish and I served Mass in three rites. Cool
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#9
(10-10-2021, 09:19 PM)archangel michael Wrote: When I was younger and an altar boy, we had Carmelites in my parish.  They had their own rite too.  One day, a Dominican priest and a Passionist priest came to my parish and I served Mass in three rites. Cool

That's amazing! I've been a Carmelite Tertiary for over 30 years But I've never seen an Old Rite Carmelite Mass. The only Rites I've ever attended are the Roman and Byzantine.
Jovan-Marya of the Immaculate Conception Weismiller, T.O.Carm.

Vive le Christ-roi! Vive le roi, Louis XX!
Deum timete, regem honorificate.
Kansan by birth! Albertan by choice! Jayhawk by the Grace of God!
“Qui me amat, amet et canem meum. (Who loves me will love my dog.)” 
St Bernard of Clairvaux

My Blog 'Musings of an Old Curmudgeon'
FishEaters Group on MeWe
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#10
(10-10-2021, 07:25 AM)Joseph of Cupertino Wrote: I'm considering attending mass at a parish relatively close to me which is staffed by the Dominican Friars of the Province of the Most Holy Name of Jesus. I've become disillusioned with the NO mass. I've never been able to attend a Tridentine mass (I became Catholic five years ago), and with the recent Summorum Pontificum I feel that any future chances to do so are even more slim. I would rather not have to consider SSPX. From what I've researched, it looks like the Dominican rite (13th century) is even older than the Tridentine mass (1570). There appears to be far fewer resources for the newcomer to the Dominican rite than for the Tridentine mass. So I'm open to any comments or suggestions that you may have. Thank you and God bless.

By the way, here is the link to the parish if you're curious: https://holyrosarypdx.org/
In revising and standardizing the mass, the Council of Trent made a rule that all rites 200 years or older could remain.
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