Offering Up Your Suffering
#1
It's one of the most powerful weapons we have in our arsenal of spiritual gifts, and yet so often we fail to make use of it. The other day a family member said something extremely offensive to me, I was just about to respond with either a counter insult, or a Bassett Hound look and a "I'd never say something like that to you" comeback.  Fortunately I remembered just in the nick of time to offer it up for this person's spiritual wellfare, and was able to mumble that to myself while smiling, when seconds earlier I wasn't sure if I wanted to punch a wall or cry.

                                                         It's not only our physical pains, and the insults we take, but our sadness, our disappointments, depression, etc that we can turn around and offer up to He who was the ultimate example of accepting suffering.
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#2
I've always been a little confused about the phrase/concept of "offering up your suffering".  Perhaps this comes from my Eastern background and orientation.  It's not something that I recall hearing about or reading about in the Eastern Church, Orthodox or Catholic, though I'm sure we have an analogous concept and practice.

In light of my ignorance, could you explain a little more what, precisely, you mean by it and how you actually do it?

When I am insulted or angered or saddened or whatever, my usual practice, if I'm quick enough :-), is to take a deep breath (or two or three) and recite the Jesus Prayer or perhaps some other very brief spontaneous prayer, maybe just a "Lord, have mercy".  Depending on the situation I may have to repeat that several or many times.

Also, remembering the Morning Prayer of St. Philaret of Moscow (one of my favorite prayers!), or parts of it, is extremely helpful:
O Lord, grant that I may meet the coming day in peace.
Help me in all things to rely upon Thy Holy Will.
In every hour of the day, reveal Thy will to me.
Bless my dealings with all who surround me.
Teach me to treat all that comes to me
throughout the day with peace of soul,
and with the firm conviction that Thy will governs all.
In all my deeds and words, guide my thoughts and feelings.
In unforeseen events, let me not forget that all are sent by Thee.

Teach me to act firmly and wisely, without embittering and embarrassing others.
Give me the strength to bear the fatigue of the coming day with all that it shall bring.
Direct my will.
Teach me to pray.
Pray Thou Thyself in me.
Amen.
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#3
Most forms of the Morning Offering include an offering to God of our sufferings that day.  If we renew this offering through the day, we can be prepared to offer our sufferings when the occasion arises.

I offer my sufferings (especially my insomnia) and unite them to Our Lord's cross.
"[I]t is vain to hope to attract souls to God by a bitter zeal."  Pope St. Pius X.

"If anyone deludes himself by thinking he is serving God, when he has not learned to control his tongue, the service he gives is vain.  If he is to offer service pure and unblemished in the sight of God, who is our Father, he must take care of orphans and widows in their need, and keep himself unstained by the world."  James 1:26-27.
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#4
(01-14-2022, 01:54 PM)J Michael Wrote: I've always been a little confused about the phrase/concept of "offering up your suffering".  Perhaps this comes from my Eastern background and orientation.  It's not something that I recall hearing about or reading about in the Eastern Church, Orthodox or Catholic, though I'm sure we have an analogous concept and practice.

In light of my ignorance, could you explain a little more what, precisely, you mean by it and how you actually do it? (snip)


See https://www.fisheaters.com/offeringitup.html
T h e   D u d e t t e   A b i d e s
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#5
A few quotes from the Saints I have cut and pasted over the years on suffering,

“All the science of the Saints is included in these two things: To do, and to suffer. And whoever had done these two things best, has made himself most saintly. “

St Francis de Sales

“O Mother, it’s very easy to write beautiful things about suffering, but writing is nothing, nothing! One must suffer in order to know! I really feel now that what I’ve said and written is true about everything….It’s true that I wanted to suffer much for God’s sake, and it’s true that I still desire this.”

St Therese de Lisieux

If we only knew the precious treasure hidden in infirmities, we would receive them with the same joy with which we receive the greatest benefits, and we would bear them without ever complaining or showing signs of weariness

St Vincent de Paul

I do not desire to die soon, because in Heaven there is no suffering. I desire to live a long time because I yearn to suffer much for the love of my Spouse.

St. Mary Magdalene de Pazzi

Sometimes the only way the good Lord can get into some hearts is to break them.

Venerable Fulton J. Sheen

I want your soul to be purified and tried by a daily hidden martyrdom. How many times, Jesus said to me a little while ago, would you have abandoned me, my son, if I had not crucified you.

Padre Pio
"Why does your teacher eat with tax collectors and sinners?" On hearing this, Jesus said, "It is not the healthy who need a doctor, but the sick. But go and learn what this means: 'I desire mercy, not sacrifice.' For I have not come to call the righteous, but sinners."  Matthew 9:10-14
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#6
(01-14-2022, 01:54 PM)J Michael Wrote: I've always been a little confused about the phrase/concept of "offering up your suffering".  Perhaps this comes from my Eastern background and orientation.  It's not something that I recall hearing about or reading about in the Eastern Church, Orthodox or Catholic, though I'm sure we have an analogous concept and practice.

I'm certain there must be an analogue in the East since it's straight from Holy Scripture. In Colossians 1:24, St Paul says, 'Even as I write, I am glad of my sufferings on your behalf, as, in this mortal frame of mine, I help to pay off the debt which the afflictions of Christ still leave to be paid, for the sake of his body, the Church'.
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#7
I've been regularly attending an Eastern Rite parish for over 2 years now, and have discussed offering up suffering, and they seemed to understand it.
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#8
I make sure to offer my family plenty of suffering every day.
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#9
(01-14-2022, 01:54 PM)J Michael Wrote: I've always been a little confused about the phrase/concept of "offering up your suffering". 

Me too.  Maybe it's the phrase itself, but whenever I try to figure it out, there are long, drawn out explanations that leave me wondering about it.  

I'd like to see something clear and concise on it.
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#10
It seems clear to me. In the chaplet, we offer up Christ's sufferings to the Lord for mercy upon the world. We can offer our own sufferings in much the same way (not to equate the two obviously).
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