Homesteaders?
#21
Our little burg is big enough to have a walmart and small enough to have farmer's market most of the year. There've been people growing backyard chickens within block of our house. We mostly grow raised beds and can/stock stuff. The Fair One and I would love congress re-enacting the Homestead Act, but I feel Madame Marionette and Senator Turtlehead and their ilk would despise the level of independence that'd engender in people.


To Vox's comment:
There's a family owned outfit roughly halfway between our town and the next big one like that. They grow food and make things, have a petting zoo, winery, et cetera. I agree. It looks like they're having fun while making a living year round.
Eternal Father, I offer Thee the most precious blood of Thy Divine Son, Jesus, in union with the Masses said Throughout the world today, for all the holy souls in Purgatory. Amen.
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#22
There are many, many things to consider before you decide to jump off into being self sufficient, or living off grid, or homesteading.

As others have pointed out, no one really is self sufficient. You can't possibly grow all the different foods you would want, medicines, drinks, ect, unless like was mentioned you want a really bland and minimal diet. It has also been mentioned that you need to know how to preserve the food. You need to know how to can, or salt cure meat. Unless you are going to guarantee that you have enough power to keep a freezer for the meat.

All the previous posts are good information.

How many tools do you have, and do you know how to use them? Do you know how to do electrical work, plumbing, carpentry, mechanic, weld? Do you have the tools for doing all that kind of stuff.

If you have to call someone to your house now to fix something every time it breaks, or if you take your car to the shop every time it needs service or repair, you will go broke on a homestead paying others to fix the stuff that either breaks or wears out.

It has taken many decades for me to acquire all the tools I have, and tens and tens of thousands of dollars. But I know how to use them and can usually fix most everything myself. Are there times when it is "easier" to have someone else do it, yep, and that is a tradeoff I sometimes make, but in a pinch I can do it.

Being self sufficient, or mostly self sufficient is a tall order, and there is a reason very, very few people even attempt to do it today. It is a lot of work, and requires a lot of knowledge, ability and things to get it done.
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#23
I’d like to learn all those things. How did you learn them?

I don’t have to be fully self-sufficient; I just want to live in the country, and I know these skills are an important part of country living.
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#24
(06-20-2022, 09:34 AM)Polymath Wrote: I’d like to learn all those things.  How did you learn them?

I don’t have to be fully self-sufficient; I just want to live in the country, and I know these skills are an important part of country living.

Are you referring to my post?

It takes years, either helping others who know or a lot of trial and error which can be costly.

In previous jobs I have done mechanic work at a transmission shop, at an Army Depot on military stuff, and construction work, both residential type, from rough carpentry to finish carpentry,  and heavy, pouring lots of concrete, hanging red iron, and stuff like that, and have long time friends who are electricians.   At 14 I helped my brother build a house, I have remodeled both my prior house and the current one.   Anything from simple flooring and changing lights/fans,  to complete bathroom remodel.   Some of it is just good old horse sense.   Some people have it, some don't, but it can be learned for the most part.

If you want to live in the country and be somewhat self sufficient, start now.   Do you have any space where you live to start a garden?   Even raised beds, or out of flowerpots?   The principles are the same.   Correct soil nutrients, correct moisture, and keeping pests and disease out of the plants.   Start small, work your way up.

Do you maintain your own yard equipment?   That is a fairly low risk way to start to learn mechanics.   Changing oil.   Sharpening blades, greasing, cleaning air filters, etc.   Maintenance is probably more important than knowing how to do a complete engine overhaul for instance.  With correct maintenance, catastrophic failure on equipment can be avoided for the most part.
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#25
A little late to the party, but here are my two cents: 

-Do as much research as you can about growing food, fixing things, and raising animals. If you are on Facebook, there are a lot of good groups on there for homesteading. 

-You said you work part-time as a programmer. If you can, try to get another part-time job working at a garden center/farm or in a small engine repair shop. The experience you will get from a real job will be much more meaningful than reading about the same topic. 

-Nebraska is a great state. They love their college football perhaps a little too much (gasp! I mean GO BIG RED) and they do this weird thing where they dip cinnamon rolls in chili (Jovan will understand), but other than that, housing is cheap and the people are friendly. 

-There is a big difference between farming and homesteading. Most homesteaders have a part or full-time job to fund the many expenses of homesteading. It's pretty much impossible to start farming today unless you are grandfathered into it by a family member. It costs untold thousands if not millions to purchase enough land and equipment to turn a profit.

-Also if it makes you feel any better, my husband has taught himself how to rebuild engines in less than a year. Now there is nothing mechanical that he can't fix. A year ago he knew nothing about it. YouTube and getting a job at a diesel shop was key in developing his knowledge.
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#26
(06-20-2022, 11:25 PM)SacraCor714 Wrote: -Nebraska is a great state. They love their college football perhaps a little too much (gasp! I mean GO BIG RED) and they do this weird thing where they dip cinnamon rolls in chili (Jovan will understand), but other than that, housing is cheap and the people are friendly. 

Hell, I live here and I grew up 12 miles from the State line in Kansas, and I still don't UNDERSTAND Nebraskans. Oh, I like them, and you're right they're nice people, but some things they do, like, or eat, go right past me. What is it with Dorothy Lynch anyway?


Of course, during football season, I tend to keep my head down! I'm a Kansas Jayhawk, born and bred, so I'm not very popular! I have a Jayhawk hoodie that I only wear when Bishop Conley comes to town. He's a Jayhawk, too. LOL!
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#27
My Grandpa was a farmer in Sicily. I have never done farming but I have always loved the idea of going rural and farming. It sounds live a beautiful life and there is a great Catholic tradition of farming.
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#28
My Grandpa was a farmer in Sicily also.... he and my Grandma moved to the United States, raised seven children in two and a half rooms in Manhattan, and eventually landed in Brooklyn, NY, and that is where I grew up.

Brooklyn was a suburban and urban area, but there was an area of some land nearby and he rented a spot and grew a lot of vegetables there.
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#29

Justin Rhodes

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