Is life…
#1
1. A beautiful thing to be enjoyed and celebrated;

2. A treacherous journey, fraught with the constant risk of falling into hell for eternity?

If you say “both,” or “neither,” please explain. And which, or what combination, do you, personally,  experience (if you wish to share)?
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#2
I see it as this life being the stepping stone to the next life....which is the Real Life. We were given everything by Our Lord to make it to Heaven.

Yes, our life here is beautiful when we are focused on the Lord. Good things happen for us and others when we offer up our sufferings. We grow spiritually when we fight temptation with prayer and the sacraments.

I believe we all experience 1. and 2. in different degrees, according to what is best for us to grow spiritually.
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#3
The answer to the first: You can achieve this if you are a practicing Catholic, in a state of grace.


The answer to the second: You will feel this, if you don't do as the first was answered.
One should have an open mind; open enough that things get in, but not so open that everything falls out
Art Bell
  
I don't need a good memory, because I always tell the truth.
Jessie Ventura

Its no wonder truth is stranger than fiction.
Fiction has to make sense
Mark Twain

All War is Deception
Gen. Sun

You don't have a soul. You are a soul. You have a body.
C.S. Lewis

Political Correctness is Fascism pretending to be manners.
George Carlin

“In a time of deceit…truth is a revolutionary act”
George Orwell
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#4
First I suffered throught wanting then I suffered throught sin and in both stages Satan and his minions pummeled me with fear. Once I realized what was going on (the gray beard stage) Satan's tactics changed. It was like for twenty years I went to bed thinking tomorrow he kills me. It's the classic Biblical line - do not fear those who can kill the flesh etc. Now I'm at the stage where the tactic (no longer fearing death (to an extent) is me (Satan) and my minions can make your life a living hell. Well I have good days and bad but there isn't a day that goes by without a miracle and this gives me hope, everyday. I guess if you had to sum it up: suffering is the path we must all take, get over it.
Oh, where are the snows of yesteryear!
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#5
Quotes such as this:

“O you, whose lives are so lax, who do not fear to stain yourselves with a thousand faults in order to please the world or spare your body a moment’s trouble, tell us: have you understood the mysteries of God’s justice, and have you meditated upon the length of torments that await you?” 

As well as many other similar things said by Saints make me wonder if enjoyment is meant to be anything more than an infrequent and strictly spiritual side-effect of following Christ. Embracing, or at least accepting suffering, doing penance, sadness and contrition for sins, faithfully carrying out mundane, boring, grinding, repetitive daily duties, always thinking of others, praying at all times, educating ourselves about the Faith — doesn’t leave much time for relaxation and merriment. 

Yet I don’t see or know of maybe anyone in my part of the world who willingly forgoes comforts such as a cozy, temperature-controlled dwelling, as good a car as they can (or can’t really) afford, good food, all kinds of entertainments, rest and relaxation (workaholics are often just indulging themselves in a different way), the pursuit of pleasurable relationships, fun family times, nice clothing and adornments, and so on — are we all doomed? (If so, I’ll definitely be first in line.)
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#6
As usual, the truly Catholic approach is both/and.

Life is meant to be enjoyed and it requires us to bear the Cross.
If I let you have the last word, it does not mean that I concede your point.
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#7
(06-23-2022, 09:10 AM)Iconodule Wrote: As usual, the truly Catholic approach is both/and.

Life is meant to be enjoyed and it requires us to bear the Cross.

OK, but a practical how-to would be helpful, lol
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#8
(06-23-2022, 09:15 AM)Margaret-Mary Wrote:
(06-23-2022, 09:10 AM)Iconodule Wrote: As usual, the truly Catholic approach is both/and.

Life is meant to be enjoyed and it requires us to bear the Cross.

OK, but a practical how-to would be helpful, lol
St. Francis de Sales’ Introduction to the Devout Life is helpful for this kind of advice. It’s especially suited to us lay folk who must live and work in the world. He teaches us how to moderate our leisure time and what it should consist in. Certainly most people these days aren’t meeting his standards, but it’s not as if they are burdensome. 

It would be helpful to know the context of the quote you gave, but it appears to be addressed to the worldly. My impression is that the spiritual life for most lay people, when we have the Faith and frequent the sacraments, is quiet confidence in God in our daily sufferings, without worry or extreme anguish.
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#9
(06-23-2022, 12:44 PM)NemoClericus Wrote:
(06-23-2022, 09:15 AM)Margaret-Mary Wrote:
(06-23-2022, 09:10 AM)Iconodule Wrote: As usual, the truly Catholic approach is both/and.

Life is meant to be enjoyed and it requires us to bear the Cross.

OK, but a practical how-to would be helpful, lol
St. Francis de Sales’ Introduction to the Devout Life is helpful for this kind of advice. It’s especially suited to us lay folk who must live and work in the world. He teaches us how to moderate our leisure time and what it should consist in. Certainly most people these days aren’t meeting his standards, but it’s not as if they are burdensome. 

It would be helpful to know the context of the quote you gave. My impression is that the spiritual life for most lay people, when we have the Faith and frequent the sacraments, is quiet confidence in God in our daily sufferings, without worry or extreme anguish.


Thank  you, this is a book I’ve thought about reading for a long time. O’ve tried listening to audio of it but haven’t gotten very far. I think I’ll get the book. 

As for the quote, it was posted on an Instagram account of a very devout third-order Dominican, who posts a lot of things from Saints and holy and devotional books, but unfortunately this time didn’t site the source— possibly I could ask them.
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#10
When life's beautiful, it can be consecrated in thanksgiving to the Lord. When life's treacherous, it can still be consecrated in trust and hope to the Lord. Whatever our Good Lord allows, while we're alive, we can we offer to Him in Faith and love. 
Oh my Jesus, I surrender myself to you. Take care of everything.--Fr Dolindo Ruotolo

Persevere..Eucharist, Holy Rosary, Brown Scapular, Confession. You will win.
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