France Bans Public Smoking; Stop Da Presses!
#1
J'ai du bon tabac dans ma tabatiere; j'ai du bon tabac, tu n'en auras pas! France has spoken, and from here on out, there will be no Gauloises to go with that angst and condescension.
 
I love the stats they come up with (how? enquiring minds want to know! I think that any death due to lung cancer is attributed to smoking -- or, if the victim isn't a smoker, then it must be "passive smoke"). No place is safe any more. There is nowhere for the smoker, the last of the lepers, to go:
 
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From the [url=http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/6032125.stm]BBC
:
 
France to ban smoking in public 
France is to ban smoking in all public places from next February, the prime minister has announced.
 
 
 
Cafes, nightclubs and restaurants are to be given until January 2008 to adapt, said Dominique de Villepin.
 
Those found in breach of the ban would be fined - 75 euros (£50) for individuals and 150 euros for the premises where the offence occurred.
 
Passive smoking kills about 13 people a day in France, Mr de Villepin said, calling the situation "unacceptable".
 
Mr de Villepin made the announcement in a television interview.
 
"We started on the basis of a simple observation - two figures: 60,000 deaths a year in our country linked directly to tobacco consumption and 5,000 deaths linked to passive smoking.
 
"It is an unacceptable reality in our country in terms of public health," he said. 
  
 
Treatment
 
Public places include stations, museums, government offices and shops, but not streets or private places such as houses or hotel rooms.
 
Quote:Yet.
 
Mr de Villepin added the state would take charge of one-third of the costs of anti-smoking treatments, such as a patch.
 
"That would represent the first month of treatment," he said.
 
Several countries have already taken similar measures.
 
Opinion polls in France - often considered a nation of smokers - suggest 70% of the people support the ban, says the BBC's Valerie Jones in Paris.
 
The European Union's most enthusiastic smokers are in Greece, Cyprus and Portugal, according to findings published in May this year.
 
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#2
I thought they smoked like chimblys over there! Yikes!
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#3
This all depends on whether they really enforce the law. I've been in airports and university buildings that were supposed to be smoke-free and was always amused to see people hanging out smoking in front of the "No Smoking" signs.  
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#4
What's going to happen to Gauloises and Gitanes and . . .
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#5
Quote:Passive smoking kills about 13 people a day in France, Mr de Villepin said, calling the situation "unacceptable". 
 
These anti-smoking people make the most outrageous, unprovable claims I have ever heard.
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#6
I don't see anything the least bit unreasonable about banning smoking in public places. It's a nuisance as well as a hazard to people with allergies and asthma. There are lots of things that are forbidden in public places--loud music, loitering, disturbing the peace, etc. And why? Because they bother other people. Smoking is no different, whether or not all the health claims are true.
I do agree, though, that it's ridiculous that smoking is really the only "sin" left in our society.
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#7
Cafes, nightclubs, and restaurants aren't "public places." They are privately owned establishments, totally different from court buildings and the like. Whether people are allowed to smoke in such places should be left to the owners.
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#8
VoxClamantis Wrote:Cafes, nightclubs, and restaurants aren't "public places." They are privately owned establishments, totally different from court buildings and the like. Whether people are allowed to smoke in such places should be left to the owners.

I agree. Then the customers and employees could decide where they would want to eat/work based on whether or not they cared about being around smokers. The owners could decide what would be better for their business. But "stations, museums, government offices and shops" are public places, and should be subject to certain rules.
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#9
liliaagri Wrote:I agree. Then the customers and employees could decide where they would want to eat/work based on whether or not they cared about being around smokers. The owners could decide what would be better for their business. But "stations, museums, government offices and shops" are public places, and should be subject to certain rules.
 
  
Shops, stations, and museums aren't public unless the government owns them.
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#10
I have a friend who did a year at l'Institut Catholique in Paris. He made a project of having his picture taken, with a cigarette in hand, under as many "No Smoking" signs as he could find! He was never asked to leave or put it out. In fact many of my European friends have expressed amazement that in the "land of the free and the home of the brave" the people blindly obey stupid laws which the Europeans would never put up with!
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