France Bans Public Smoking; Stop Da Presses!
#11
VoxClamantis Wrote:
liliaagri Wrote:I agree. Then the customers and employees could decide where they would want to eat/work based on whether or not they cared about being around smokers. The owners could decide what would be better for their business. But "stations, museums, government offices and shops" are public places, and should be subject to certain rules.
 
  
Shops, stations, and museums aren't public unless the government owns them.

I took the "shops" as going with "government" as in "government offices and government shops." Most museums and stations are government owned, I believe, unless we're talking about gas stations. My point was that while the owners of private property should be allowed to do whatever they want with their property, I think it's perfectly reasonable to outlaw a public nuisance like smoking in public places.
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#12
liliaagri Wrote:My point was that while the owners of private property should be allowed to do whatever they want with their property, I think it's perfectly reasonable to outlaw a public nuisance like smoking in public places.
  Then by your logic, it should be reasonable to ban other legal activities that are "public nuisances"? I'm thinking of things like Corpus Christ processions that block streets, causing a "public nuisance".
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#13
jovan66102 Wrote:Then by your logic, it should be reasonable to ban other legal activities that are "public nuisances"? I'm thinking of things like Corpus Christ processions that block streets, causing a "public nuisance".  

I'm sorry, I don't really see a connection. Obviously, in a Catholic country such a thing would not be a nuisance. Even in the US I suppose you could get permission for something like that (people do get permission to close streets for various reasons) but I don't know how that's connected to an individual doing something that's unpleasant for and sometimes harmful to the people around him.
 
I'm thinking of things like eating on public transportation, littering, loud music, etc. I don't know why an exception should be made for smoking.
 
 
 
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#14
liliaagri Wrote:My point was that while the owners of private property should be allowed to do whatever they want with their property, I think it's perfectly reasonable to outlaw a public nuisance like smoking in public places.

Public nuisance to who? Non-smokers?
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#15
JLeigh Wrote:
liliaagri Wrote:My point was that while the owners of private property should be allowed to do whatever they want with their property, I think it's perfectly reasonable to outlaw a public nuisance like smoking in public places.

Public nuisance to who? Non-smokers?
  Good point! [Image: laff.gif]
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#16
JLeigh Wrote:Public nuisance to who? Non-smokers?

As I stated at the beginning, people with allergies and asthma. I get very unpleasant allergic reactions from smoke, and for some people it can trigger an asthma attack, which can be very dangerous.
 
And in any case, it smells bad. So you could say, yes, it's a nuisance to non-smokers. (I'm assuming that smokers don't mind the smell and/or don't notice it.) A lot of things are outlawed because although they might not be annoying to the person doing them, they are annoying to other people around them. It has a lot to do with common courtesy, but in a public place it can be taken a step further and actually forbidden.
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#17
liliaagri Wrote:As I stated at the beginning, people with allergies and asthma. I get very unpleasant allergic reactions from smoke, and for some people it can trigger an asthma attack, which can be very dangerous.  
And in any case, it smells bad. So you could say, yes, it's a nuisance to non-smokers. (I'm assuming that smokers don't mind the smell and/or don't notice it.) A lot of things are outlawed because although they might not be annoying to the person doing them, they are annoying to other people around them. It has a lot to do with common courtesy, but in a public place it can be taken a step further and actually forbidden.

Then they can just do what they have already been doing for some time - designated smoking and non-smoking areas. There. Problem solved.
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#18
JLeigh Wrote:
liliaagri Wrote:As I stated at the beginning, people with allergies and asthma. I get very unpleasant allergic reactions from smoke, and for some people it can trigger an asthma attack, which can be very dangerous.  
And in any case, it smells bad. So you could say, yes, it's a nuisance to non-smokers. (I'm assuming that smokers don't mind the smell and/or don't notice it.) A lot of things are outlawed because although they might not be annoying to the person doing them, they are annoying to other people around them. It has a lot to do with common courtesy, but in a public place it can be taken a step further and actually forbidden.

Then they can just do what they have already been doing for some time - designated smoking and non-smoking areas. There. Problem solved.

In a museum?
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#19
liliaagri Wrote:In a museum?
  A no brainer. Smoking lounges for those who want to take a break.
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#20
liliaagri Wrote:In a museum?

What - you can't have a smoking area in a museum?
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