Mysterium Fidei
#1
Do the Eastern Rites proclaim the Mysterium Fidei?
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#2
CounterRevolutionary Wrote:Do the Eastern Rites proclaim the Mysterium Fidei?

 
If you mean "Are the words mysterium fidei contained in the form of the consecration of the Precious Blood in any the eastern rites?", the answer is no.
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#3
I think the Armenian Catholics do have the Latinized form, but the others do not.
 
Acclaiming the "Mystery of the Faith" immediately after the Consecration is not done in the Novus Ordo way in any Eastern Rite. Still an Amen is said.
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#4
Do they all say "for many" in the consecration?
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#5
Here's a link to the consecration prayer of the Armenian Catholics:
 
http://www.armeniancatholic.org/inside.php?lang=en&page_id=6206
 
As you can see, there is no mysterium fidei, but, if you look at the beginning of the Divine Liturgy, you can see that they have borrowed Psalm 42 from the Roman Mass. 
 
The Maronite Divine Liturgy (Mass) has a number of Anaphoras (canons).  At one time, they had one called "the Anaphora of the Holy Roman Church)", which was a slightly edited version of the Roman Canon, borrowed from the Latins at the time of the Crusades.  This Anaphora used the Roman form of the consecraion of the Precious Blood, including mysterium fidei.  I do not think it is used any more.
 
I am not aware of any eastern church that does not use "for you and for many" in the Consecration.  I did see "for all" many years ago in a Maronite pew book, but the Maronites almost always use Aramaic in the consecration, because they want to use Our Lord's language.
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#6
Saint Thomas Aquinas wrote: “The words added, namely, eternal and mystery of faith, were handed down to the Church by the apostles, who received them from our Lord, according to 1 Cor. 11:23: ‘I have received of the Lord that which also I delivered unto you.’” (Summa, III, q. 78, a. 3)

Why do the Eastern Catholics not have the words mystery of faith?

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#7
Apparently it was a tradition handed down only in the Roman Rite. It is not in scripture.
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#8
St. Thomas was not at the Last Supper; he is speculating.  One theory is that mysterium fidei was an exclamation originally uttered by the deacon at the  consecration, and that the celebrants began to say it in the absence of a deacon.  In any event, it is unique to the Roman Canon.
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#9
We should also consider that St. Irenaeus and St. Justin Martyr mention that Christ taught the Apostles how to say Mass. He would have probably not done so only at the Last Supper but also during the forty days after His Resurrection and before His Ascension into heaven.
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#10
spasiisochrani Wrote:St. Thomas was not at the Last Supper; he is speculating. One theory is that mysterium fidei was an exclamation originally uttered by the deacon at the consecration, and that the celebrants began to say it in the absence of a deacon. In any event, it is unique to the Roman Canon.

How is it speculation? Pope Innocent III said as much in his Apostolic letter Cum Marthae circa (I might have the name wrong), that the words of Consecration in the Roman Rite were handed down from the Apostles.
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